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Is it Safe to Reuse a Crib Mattress?

Is it Safe to Reuse a Crib Mattress?


LIVESTRONG.COM

There's no doubt about it: having a baby is expensive. After buying a stroller, crib, clothing, feeding supplies, diapers and other essentials, your wallet can quickly empty out. It's natural to begin looking for ways to save money on all the items you need for baby, and one way is by buying used items. While some used items are good news for your...

Mattress Buying Guide & Secret Tips

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

Anyone interested in buying a new mattress will know how difficult it can be to make the right choice. Considering many of the mattresses for sale whether in a showroom or online can easily be an expensive purchase, it’s important that your selection is wise and really should be viewed as an investment rather than a product. In this section below we discuss many of the things to consider when it comes to choosing a mattress, ranging from size, hypoallergenic properties, and much more. Not just to address value for money, but to ensure you’re sleeping on something you’ll cherish for

The post Mattress Buying Guide & Secret Tips appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Shopping for Used Mattresses

Shopping for Used Mattresses


Consumer Information

In most parts of the country, used mattresses can be resold as long as they meet certain labeling requirements.

Resolutions Bounce Back: Stay on Track With the Right Sleep Environment

by The Daily Dozers @ The Daily Doze

As January wraps up, it’s time to reflect on how you’ve been doing with the #NoYawnNewYear Challenge and your new year’s resolutions. Are you dozing off easier each night, sleeping better or eating fewer fatty foods at meals? We know that investing in your rest is the key to maintaining lasting lifestyle changes year round. While the […]

The post Resolutions Bounce Back: Stay on Track With the Right Sleep Environment appeared first on The Daily Doze.

We've Recycled One Million Mattresses!

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

The Mattress Recycling Council’s Bye Bye Mattress program announced that it has recycled its one millionth mattress. This means that Bye Bye Mattress has diverted nearly 25,000 tons of materials from landfills in the three states that MRC serves – California, Connecticut and Rhode Island. Each state enacted its own mattress recycling law to reduce […]

The post We've Recycled One Million Mattresses! appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

4 Budget-Friendly Ideas for Decorating Your Guest Bedroom

by The Savvy Savers @ The Daily Doze

Creating a cozy bedroom for guests is a great way to make them feel welcomed and relaxed, even if they are far from home. But often, the guest bedroom is the most overlooked room in the house. The good news is you don’t have to spend a lot of money to ensure that your guests […]

The post 4 Budget-Friendly Ideas for Decorating Your Guest Bedroom appeared first on The Daily Doze.

American Textile adds experienced IT exec Carlo Morgano

by BedTimes @ BedTimes

Duquesne, Pennsylvania-based American Textile Co., a producer of name-brand and nonbranded mattress protection products, pillows and bedding, has named Carlo Morgano to the new position senior vice president of information technology.  Most recently, Morgano was with CIO Ventures, where he consulted with technology incubators and venture capital firms, in addition to advising startups in various industries, including […]

The post American Textile adds experienced IT exec Carlo Morgano appeared first on BedTimes.

Best Soft Mattress for Your Needs

by Candace Osmond @ The Sleep Judge

Rhode Island Plan Approved

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

RHODE ISLAND RESOURCE RECOVERY CORPORATION APPROVES MATTRESS RECYCLING COUNCIL’S PLAN STATEDWIDE MATTRESS RECYCLING PROGRAM TO BEGIN MAY 1, 2016 ALEXANDRIA, VA – On January 13, 2016, the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation (RIRRC) approved the Rhode Island Mattress Recycling Plan proposed by the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC), a non-profit organization created by the mattress industry […]

The post Rhode Island Plan Approved appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

Discussing Mattress Pads vs Toppers

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

After a long hard day’s work, many of us look forward to coming home and crashing out on a comfortable bed. However, we get home, throw our clothes to the floor and jump in bed only to find it’s no longer as comfortable as it once was. What to do next? Perhaps buying a new mattress isn’t an option, after all they can be quite expensive, or perhaps your landlord advises against it, or maybe even donating a mattress where you live is difficult. There are numerous constraints one can come across. In which case, an excellent answer to these

The post Discussing Mattress Pads vs Toppers appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Man takes to Craigslist to sell mattress his girlfriend used to cheat on him

Man takes to Craigslist to sell mattress his girlfriend used to cheat on him


New York Post

For 150 bucks you can buy a mattress full of heartbreak. Some poor bloke listed his mattress for sale in what has to be the saddest Craigslist ad ever written. The seller explained in the listing t…

Survey: Would You Buy a Used Mattress?

Survey: Would You Buy a Used Mattress?


Apartment Therapy

There are a lot of easy things to do in the bedroom to keep it green

Mattresses & Box Springs - Stockton Recycling Guide

Mattresses & Box Springs - Stockton Recycling Guide


Stockton Recycles

Can I Recycle Mattresses & Box Springs? Stockton Recycles tells you what you can recycle and what gets tossed out.

APPLY FOR FINANCING HERE

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

Call A Mattress offers financing through Progessive Leasing.  Click the link below to fill out the simple quick application and receive an  instant response. https://www.progressivelp.com/onlineapplication/onlineapplication.aspx?sid=CallA3523760953

The post APPLY FOR FINANCING HERE appeared first on Call A Mattress.

4 Common Mattress Materials Filled With Toxic Chemicals

4 Common Mattress Materials Filled With Toxic Chemicals


SleepLily

Is your mattress emitting toxic chemicals into your bedroom? You may be surprised to learn that the most common mattress materials are also the most toxic.

SIDS : How to Reduce the Risk [Infographic]

by Jonathan Prichard @ Insider Living

Let’s face it: Experts don’t know what causes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). What they do know is how to minimize the risks. In today’s infographic, you’ll learn some interesting facts about SIDS along with 10 ways you can reduce the risks. Check it out: Decreasing the likelihood of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) What…

The post SIDS : How to Reduce the Risk [Infographic] appeared first on Insider Living.

Reducing Pain and Chronic Insomnia With the Right Mattress

by Mattressdept @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

Pain—that throbbing sensation in your lower back, or the radiating discomfort that is shooting through your arms—can make it really difficult to sleep. Anyone who has suffered from chronic pain knows how difficult it can be to get to sleep when the pain is bad....

The post Reducing Pain and Chronic Insomnia With the Right Mattress appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

Harmful Misconceptions about Sleep

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

We tend to hear myths about sleep. Many have been around since before we were born, and people tend to simply accept them as fact. While most of these are fairly harmless, some are highly detrimental to your health. Here are a few such examples,...

The post Harmful Misconceptions about Sleep appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

spideyjg on "buying a used mattress"

by spideyjg @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

suegr98 - 3 hours ago  » 
but cannot afford a brand new mattress.)

Don't! If you can't afford a new mattress you sure can't afford the astronomical cost of BBs.

If you absolutely must, get an encasement before it ever gets in your home.

Jim

How Much is a Used Mattress and Box Spring Worth

How Much is a Used Mattress and Box Spring Worth


STLBeds

What is a used mattress and boxspring worth? Is there any value if only gently used and clean? Does age and condition affect the asking pric...

Call A Mattress Launches New Website

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

Call A Mattress is excited to be launching our new website now better geared to serve our customers’ needs. The new website design is cleaner and clearer and also looks great on mobile phones and devices. Please have a look through our store and let us know what you think.

The post Call A Mattress Launches New Website appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Is A Clearance Mattress Right For You? | Mattress Tips & Education | The Daily Doze Blog

Is A Clearance Mattress Right For You? | Mattress Tips & Education | The Daily Doze Blog


The Daily Doze

The Daily Doze helps you understand what a pre-owned (used) mattress is, bust mattress clearances myths, and give you the pros and cons of clearance mattresses.

Should Pregnant Women Buy Pregnancy Pillows?

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

A pillow provides many benefits, and there are several different types to suit each usage too. In fact, there is a pillow that can help with almost any type of rest, seating, or laying down position. Whether it’s a goose down pillow for luxurious bed time sleep, a wedge pillow for helping position whilst catching up on TV shows, or a neck pillow for traveling, these little wonders are everywhere, and very much needed too. One of the common and somewhat essential types required by women today are known as pregnancy pillows. Simply put, these are specially designed to suit

The post Should Pregnant Women Buy Pregnancy Pillows? appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Bed in a Box: How Does It Work?

by Taylor Jones @ The Drömma Bed

Shopping for a new mattress is an endeavor to take seriously. Mattresses are a major home investment, due largely to how long they need to last: the National Sleep Foundation recommends replacing your mattress every 7 to ten years. Additionally, your mattress plays a role in the quality of sleep you get, meaning what mattress you buy could have a major impact on your physical and emotional health. However, the mattress buying model is outdated. No one wants to spend their weekend in a brick and mortar mattress store, faced with an overwhelming amount of choices and pushy sales people. […]

The post Bed in a Box: How Does It Work? appeared first on The Drömma Bed.

Lakers’ Lonzo Ball ramps up workouts but says he still can’t sprint or jump

Lakers’ Lonzo Ball ramps up workouts but says he still can’t sprint or jump

by Bill Oram @ San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Coach Luke Walton said the 20-year-old would try to progress on Wednesday to the “full-speed, non-contact” drills that would signal that he’s ready to return to practice.

Our Purple vs. Casper Mattress Comparison for 2018

by Valerie Dunn @ Sleep Authority

The post Our Purple vs. Casper Mattress Comparison for 2018 appeared first on Sleep Authority.

Finding the Perfect Materials for Non-Toxic Mattress

by exampleuser @ SleepLily

Building the perfect non-toxic mattress starts with finding the safest, most natural materials. Because no matter what other companies do in the manufacturing process, or how many fancy marketing names they create to make their products “sound” more organic, if you don’t start with pure, wholesome materials, you can’t create a truly non-toxic mattress. So when... Read more »

The post Finding the Perfect Materials for Non-Toxic Mattress appeared first on SleepLily.

Learn How to Sell a Used Mattress (And Get the Best Price)

Learn How to Sell a Used Mattress (And Get the Best Price)


Sleep Authority

Considering selling your old mattress? Before you do, make sure to check out how to do it properly (state regulations) and how to get the best price...

Mattress Disposal - Sleepyhead Beds

Mattress Disposal - Sleepyhead Beds


Sleepyhead Beds

Best mattress disposal option. We'll clean and sanitize it and then give it to a KC area kid who does not have a bed. You can get a needy kid off the floor.

suegr98 on "buying a used mattress"

by suegr98 @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

I am buying a used mattress. How can I be sure I do not introduce bed bugs into my home? (which is bug free right now and we'd like to keep it that way but cannot afford a brand new mattress.) I am in Minnesota and the temp outside is in the low 30's. If I leave the mattress outside overnight will the cold kill any possible bugs/eggs? Should I fumigate? Encase? Thanks in advance!

How to dispose of your old mattress in California

How to dispose of your old mattress in California


San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Every time you purchase a six-pack of soda, beer or bottled water, you pay a fee to help get the containers recycled. The same is true for larger items, such as tires, laptop computers and TVs. Now…

What to do to Get The Best Night’s Sleep Tonight

by The Daily Dozers @ The Daily Doze

With January coming to a close, it’s easy to start forgetting about those New Year’s Resolutions and the lofty goals you set just four weeks ago. In 2018, we encourage you to hold yourself accountable all year long. An easy way to do that is by printing out some of our helpful tips and leaving […]

The post What to do to Get The Best Night’s Sleep Tonight appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Dromma Black Friday Sale

by Taylor Jones @ The Drömma Bed

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!  We’re happy to announce Dromma’s Black Friday sale of $200 off any mattress + 2 of our new cooling Dromma Hotel Pillows! To take advantage of this offer, add your desired mattress and a set of the Dromma Hotel Pillows to the cart and use promo code BLKFRI200 at checkout.

The post Dromma Black Friday Sale appeared first on The Drömma Bed.

When Did People Start Moving Fast Enough to Experience Jet Lag?

When Did People Start Moving Fast Enough to Experience Jet Lag?

by Joshua Keating @ The Drift

As I write this, hurtling west at 550 miles per hour, the flight attendant is politely telling the guy in the row ahead of me to close his window. It’s daylight outside, it was daylight when we took off five hours ago on a Saturday morning, and it will still be daylight when we land in Seoul on a Sunday morning seven hours from now, but the airline has decided it’s time for us all to get some shut-eye. They’re doing this for our own good, but I’m not really tired yet, so I’m opting to stay up and suffer the consequences later.

“Cures” for jet lag abound online. They range from the commonsensical—timing your light exposure and sleep patterns before you leave in order to ease the transition—to the quackish: taking Viagra or shining a light behind your knees. But there’s something a bit strange about the idea that jet lag is a “condition” to be cured rather than the inevitable disorientation resulting from zooming across the Earth at speeds exponentially greater than humans had ever experienced until a few decades ago. Jet lag may be “future shock” at its most tangible, but when did it first emerge as an affliction? At what point did people start moving fast enough that it became an issue?

The exhaustion associated with long-distance travel is nothing new—the Declaration of Independence faults King George III for his habit of forcing legislators to attend meetings “at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant … for the sole purpose of fatiguing them.” The effects of time zone shifts were less evident in the age of sailing ships: During the two months Columbus and his crew spent making a trip that now takes about nine hours, the time difference was the least of their problems. Formal time zones weren’t established in the United States until 1883, when the coordination of nationwide rail travel made them a necessity; before that, most cities and town kept their own time.

According to a 1969 study on the topic by the Federal Aviation Administration, the first person to write in detail about the effect of rapid time zone shifts on air travelers was famed American aviator Wiley Post, best known as the first person to fly solo around the world and for the 1935 crash in Alaska that killed him and humorist Will Rogers. Post first made a name for himself in 1931 by circumnavigating the globe in just eight days and 15 hours, a world record. Post’s flight, in the plane Winnie Mae, shattered the 21-day record held by Germany’s Graf Zeppelin, demonstrating the superior speed of fixed-wing aircraft and making a case for the commercial viability of transcontinental flight.

Post and his navigator, Harold Gatty, recount their meticulous preparations in their co-written account, Around the World in Eight Days, including how they anticipated what we now call jet lag. Post writes:

I knew that the variance in time as we progressed would bring on acute fatigue if I were used to regular hours. So for the greater part of the winter before the flight, I never slept during the same hours on any two days in the same week. Breaking oneself of such common habits as regular sleeping hours is far more difficult than flying an airplane!

Later, while flying over the vast interior of the Soviet Union, Gatty informs the reader:

It is sometimes hard for non-navigators to realize that it can be 6:32 p.m. in Siberia and lunch time (1:32 p.m.) in London, when New Yorkers are just getting through their morning mail at 9:32 a.m., and that on all these hours of the same day, the next day is already 1 hour, 32 minutes old at the 180 th meridian, known as the International Date Line.

This was mind-blowing stuff in 1931. But less than 30 years later, jet travel was commonplace, and its accompanying malady entered the national conversation. The 1958 Popular Mechanics article “Trials of the Jet-Age Traveler” informed readers that “flying around the world at nearly the speed of sound will throw your eating and sleeping schedules off as never before. … You can make a mental adjustment by simply resetting your watch while whizzing over the time zones of Paris, Beirut or Karachi. But your body doesn’t change its routine so easily.” The article notes that while airlines are trying to anticipate the problem by timing their flights and meals to help travelers adjust, “there is no pat solution. Jet-age passengers will just have to live through a little inconvenience.”

Smithsonian’s Air and Space magazine traced the first newspaper use of the term jet lag to a Los Angeles Times article from 1966. “If you’re going to be a member of the Jet Set and fly off to Katmandu for coffee with King Mahendra, you can count on contracting Jet Lag, a debility not un-akin to a glorious hangover.” The New York Times picked up on the term that same year in an article discussing the impact of fatigue on baseball players over the course of a long season. Teams owning their own planes were still something of a novelty; the paper wrote that players were starting to experience “ ‘Jet Lag,’ an invidious and debilitating ailment that acts like a nasty hangover.” (You have to wonder if the sensation being described actually had more to do with the in-flight refreshments of the Mad Men era.)

Jet travel and its side effects may be less novel today than they were in the ’60s, but jet lag is still the nuisance it was in Post’s day. It’s likely something we’ll have to cope with until the next disorienting advancement in travel comes along. The Atlantic recently pointed out that human colonies on Mars would have to adjust to the fact that the Martian day is 40 minutes longer than Earth’s. What will Mars lag feel like? Probably a hangover.

Read more from the Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

Four Simple Ways to Get Healthy Without Breaking the Bank

by The Savvy Savers @ The Daily Doze

Why is it that it’s so easy (and cheap) to make unhealthy decisions? It’s almost impossible to go to Whole Foods without spending an entire paycheck, yet you can get several meals at McDonald’s for under $10. Something’s just not right about that. Being healthy shouldn’t break the bank. That’s why we’ve compiled a few […]

The post Four Simple Ways to Get Healthy Without Breaking the Bank appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Driving Drowsy Scholarship by MattressInsider.com [2018]

by Jonathan Prichard @ Insider Living

Mattress Insider is running a reoccurring scholarship essay contest for students who admit to falling asleep behind the wheel.  The deadline to submit is Feb 1, 2018. Here are the details: Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that driving drunk is dangerous.  But did you know that driving while tired is just…

The post Driving Drowsy Scholarship by MattressInsider.com [2018] appeared first on Insider Living.

Sleep Trackers Promise to Improve Our Sleep. They Only Made Me Feel More Helpless.

Sleep Trackers Promise to Improve Our Sleep. They Only Made Me Feel More Helpless.

by Jacob Brogan @ The Drift

I am writing this article because I am deeply in debt, and I don’t know what to do. I’m not out of work. And it’s not that I’m broke. The source of my profound destitution: I’m not sleeping enough.

I never thought in terms of “sleep debts” until I found SleepBot, one of two apps—the other is called Sleep Cycle—that I used to record my sleep for most of November. Each night for a month, I set my phone face down on my mattress, not far from where I lay my head. Each morning I was awoken by one of the app’s klaxons—a sound supposedly keyed to my biorhythms, but as irritating as any other alarm. And each day my “current debt” accumulated, unslept hours stacking atop one another, pulling me down with them. 

SleepBot sets a goal for me each night: eight hours of steady slumber. That figure is flexible (set it as low as three if you dare), but eight hours is the default. Whatever its possible benefits, this app and others like it have less to do with the science of sleep than with the appearance of scientific precision. SleepBot’s economic language is telling, too: However poorly we sleep, to speak of it in terms of debt is to hold out the possibility that things might be otherwise—that we might hoard sleep, grow rich with shut eye.

But what we quantify when we quantify sleep is something almost entirely beyond our control. Sleep-tracker apps employ our smartphone’s accelerometers to track our involuntary movements while we snooze; Sleep Cycle weaves this data into a visual story about each night’s rest, a pictorial narrative of peaks and valleys. When the user is relatively immobile—in deep sleep—the line sinks, but the more you toss and turn, the higher it climbs. Even the best charts spike and fall, but, in theory, a good night would be one spent mostly in the low country.

However elegantly this information is presented, it’s hard to say what one is supposed to take from it. As I’ve written before, research suggests that people benefit from quantified-self technologies—pedometers, heart rate trackers, and so on—when they’re willing to really explore the data they’re generating. In the month that I spent studying my sleep, I learned only one thing: that I tend to wake up at 4 a.m. for half an hour, regardless of when I go to bed. Everything else seems indistinguishable from the anecdotal or the obvious. I don’t need a smartphone to tell me I shouldn’t drink so much caffeine in the late afternoon.

If anything, tracking my sleep may have disrupted the very experience it aspired to monitor and assist. Thanks to the way these apps function, I had to keep my phone near my head. My first instinct when I wake up in the middle of the night with the phone nearby is to fumble for it—checking my email, scrolling through Twitter, and otherwise catching up with the activity of a world that could have safely waited. Sometimes I would flip back over to my tracking apps, hopeful that their meaningless data streams would bore me back to sleep. Even in this, they failed me.

There are, of course, alternatives to monitoring by phone. My friend Ben swears by his Fitbit, which resides more inconspicuously on his wrist. He takes great pride in the information it feeds him, letting me know whenever he breaks his personal record for consecutive hours of deep sleep. In his attempt to keep shattering it, he’s started to pay more attention to things such as when he turns the lights out or whether or not to have that last cocktail. I suppose this is the best-case scenario for sleep tracking: that it inspires us to make better decisions.

Still, the actions we take in response to sleep trackers don’t necessarily correlate to the data they produce. When you’re wearing a pedometer, steps taken correspond to steps recorded. But if you cut out caffeine before bed, that’s no guarantee that your device will record “better” sleep—or that you’ll actually sleep better. If you don’t sleep better, carefully monitoring your results will only foreground your failure. Sleep trackers can make spectacles of our helplessness.

That, at any rate, is what sleep tracking has shown me. It’s taught me that I don’t control my own sleep and probably never will. To strain that economic metaphor: I’ve never been great at keeping track of my finances, and I live in dread of my lack of fiscal self-control. When I confront my supposed sleep debt, however, I’m forced to accept that I control almost nothing at all—not myself, not my bedtime, and certainly not anything that happens after I doze off.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

The 6 Best Mattress Picks For Under $1000 – 2018 Edition

by Sarah Cummings @ The Sleep Advisor

The post The 6 Best Mattress Picks For Under $1000 – 2018 Edition appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

Our In-Depth DreamCloud Bed Review for 2018

by Sarah Cummings @ The Sleep Advisor

The post Our In-Depth DreamCloud Bed Review for 2018 appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

Watching People Live Stream Themselves Sleeping Can Be Dull, Creepy, and Strangely Sweet

Watching People Live Stream Themselves Sleeping Can Be Dull, Creepy, and Strangely Sweet

by Willa Paskin @ The Drift

Watching someone sleep is intimate and a little creepy. In movies and television, when people wake up to discover they are being stared at, they rear their heads back, cover up their morning breath, and giggle awkwardly, scanning the covers for cover. When we sleep, we’re vulnerable. Also, maybe, we’re drooling. If it’s a little odd to study the face of a sleeping intimate, what does that make it to watch the face of a sleeping stranger?

You can do just this on YouNow, an app that allows users to broadcast video of themselves live (just profiled in fascinating detail by Slate’s Amanda Hess). In a YouNow channel called #sleepingsquad people, largely teens, record themselves sleeping, lounging in bed, getting ready for bed, or using YouNow to put off going to bed.

“Who is in here,” one teen in New Jersey asked another at 9:40 on a Wednesday night. “Me, you, and a new person,” his friend replied, in her pajamas. “I gotta wait until that new person leaves,” he said. I realized I was the person; I clicked out so they could go to sleep. A few minutes later, when I checked back in, the lights had dimmed and they were both in bed, a red lava lamp pulsing in the corner. I was still the only person watching.

On #sleepingsquad, you can watch about a dozen people at a time sleeping or performing some sleep-adjacent behavior. If a user has lots of fans, as Tyler Knight does, maybe when he sleeps—face smashed into a pillow—the chat room will be hopping with other users discussing how cute he is, wondering if he is hungry, declaring him a bae, or bickering about the stuffed animal, Toby, peeking into the frame. “y dos he sleep with the stuffed Nimal,” one user asked, only to be swiftly set straight by another, “Because Toby is gr8,” and then still another, “its toby and cause he wants to.” Are they really strangers if they know the name of your transitional object?

But most users only amass a significant number of viewers—by which I mean, more than 10— when they are awake. I saw one girl streaming herself lying in bed, reading her iPhone, while, in the background, The Polar Express played on a TV she was ignoring. Another woman lay in bed silently, sometimes playing with her hair, at others reading on an iPad she held so it entirely blocked her face. Watching people on their screens through a screen: It sounds like end times, but it feels more like watching a yule log burning, ambient background motion dependent on our lizard brains’ fascination with the movement of fire and other people.

#Sleepingsquad, like so much about technology, conflates our vanity and our vulnerability, our self-obsession and our sharing instincts, in confusing ways. Broadcasting oneself sleeping, like tweeting about one’s breakfast, seems like the height of self-involvement: Who could possibly care? But what kind of vanity is it that invites people—potentially predatory ones—to see you at your most exposed, most pedestrian, most mouth breathing? If this is narcissism, it’s a narcissism that doesn’t put forth a polished, perfect face but an actual snoring one. What better way to proclaim that you woke up like this than to actually show yourself waking up?

Katie Notopoulos, writing about #sleepingsquad for BuzzFeed this past March, proffered a number of plausible theories as to why tweens might broadcast or watch themselves sleeping: boredom, fun, the thrill of constant feedback and stimulation, or some combination thereof, along with complete unconcern about potential lurking perverts and creeps. Zach Clayton, YouNow’s most popular broadcaster and the guy who first streamed himself sleeping, told Hess, “I actually started sleepingsquad. A couple months ago, it was a much bigger thing. There would be like 200 people on the hashtag. When I first did it, it was like 12 o clock on a school night, and I just wanted to get on, but I was so tired. I actually got requests, like, ‘can you sleep on broadcast?’ And I was like, ‘I’ll try, but I don’t know how that would work out.’ I haven’t done it in a long time. Months after I started it, I looked back on it and thought, ‘That’s so weird. Why did I even make that a thing?’ ”

I direct messaged with a teenager who had just guested on a friend’s #sleepingsquad broadcast, and he too thought it was a pretty strange channel. (When someone guests, the stream turns into a split screen, and you can see the original streamer and their guest side by side.) “To be honest I don’t think it’s a hashtag that should be present, as it could possibly endanger you with regards to potential pedophiles on the site,” he wrote. “People broadcast on it as a way for them to gain more experience points and level up. In my eyes it really is quite creepy.” (Apparently a guest broadcast is not an endorsement.)

It is very, very easy to write off #sleepingsquad—if not YouNow more largely—as an ill-conceived, time-wasting, under-regulated, possibly dangerous way for teens to act out their goofy, insecure, fame-seeking ids. But trawl around YouNow for even a little while and you will find some surprising stuff to go along with the inane, dull, squicky, and otherwise unwatchable. Take, for example, Dr. Greg, a middle-aged pastor who faithfully reads through his chat room and assembles a list of people asking that he pray for them, and all the while, a line of text crawls across the screen declaring this a non-hateful, LBGTQ-accepting space.

Unexpectedly nice things can happen on #sleepingsquad. A girl, in bed, invites a friend to guest and they talk for a few minutes, in the sort of incoherent way people do when they are both paying attention to something else—in this case, the chatroom. For a while the girl can’t even be heard because her mic isn’t set up properly. The boy, who has an Australian accent, says he went to an Ed Sheeran concert earlier that night. She asks him to play her something, a request he seems to ignore, until, suddenly, minutes later, he takes out his acoustic guitar and begins to sing. He has a small, sweet voice. Not too bad to fall asleep to, really.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

Everything You Need to Know About Mattress Firm’s Big Price Drop

by The Savvy Savers @ The Daily Doze

At Mattress Firm, we know that bigger does mean better when it comes to your mattress. And we’re here to tell you that bigger is also in your budget, so now is the time to give yourself the luxury of a larger bed, at a price you can afford. The Big Price Drop Why now? […]

The post Everything You Need to Know About Mattress Firm’s Big Price Drop appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Why Good Sleep Matters So Much

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

We humans spend about one-third of our lives asleep. This one-third greatly impacts the quality of the other two-thirds of our lives. Many things contribute to a good night’s rest, and your mattress lies at the foundation. According to WebMD, when it comes to sleep quality, “to get it right, you’ve got to start with the basics and your mattress is the first building block to a restful slumber.” After all, if you’re tossing and turning all night, struggling to get your body into a pain-free position, your sleep quality will be poor, and your wellness will suffer. The Importance

The post Why Good Sleep Matters So Much appeared first on Choose Mattress.

5 Simple Reasons Why It Makes Sense to Invest in a New Mattress

by The Savvy Savers @ The Daily Doze

A new mattress can literally change every part of your life. It affects the comfort and functionality of your bedroom and the way you live at home. Also, lack of sleep can lead to irritability, poor diet and an overall decline in health. Sleep is something that everyone should invest in. 1. You’ll be sleeping on this […]

The post 5 Simple Reasons Why It Makes Sense to Invest in a New Mattress appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Man takes to Craigslist to sell mattress his girlfriend used to cheat on him

Man takes to Craigslist to sell mattress his girlfriend used to cheat on him

by Post Staff Report @ Man takes to Craigslist to sell mattress his girlfriend used to cheat on him | New York Post

For 150 bucks you can buy a mattress full of heartbreak. Some poor bloke listed his mattress for sale in what has to be the saddest Craigslist ad ever written. The seller explained in the listing titled “Come get this Plush-ass Simmons Beautyrest out of my life” that he was disposing of the mattress after...

150,000 Mattress Diverted From Landfill in Connecticut

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

Last week, the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) presented its inaugural Annual Report of the Connecticut Bye Bye Mattress Program to Connecticut municipal leaders and state regulators. The report summarized the Program’s performance from its inception in May 2015 through the end of the state’s 2016 fiscal year (June 30). The Program has already exceeded, met […]

The post 150,000 Mattress Diverted From Landfill in Connecticut appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

Press Conference Held Today to Launch Bye Bye Mattress

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

Sacramento, CA – Today, government officials, municipal and solid waste representatives and the mattress industry gathered at the state Capitol building to commemorate the launch of the state’s new mattress recycling program. “For too long, abandoned mattresses have blighted our communities,” said Sen. Loni Hancock, D-Oakland, author of the measure that created California’s mattress-recycling program. […]

The post Press Conference Held Today to Launch Bye Bye Mattress appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

On Sleeping Styles and Positions

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

There’s always something mysterious about sleep. Other than allowing us to regain our strength in a very elaborate fashion, it also gives a number of hints about our health and the type of lifestyle we have. There have been many studies and surveys about sleeping,...

The post On Sleeping Styles and Positions appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

The Eight-Hour Sleep Session Is Not What You Need

The Eight-Hour Sleep Session Is Not What You Need

by Gabriel Roth @ The Drift

We know how much sleep we need: eight hours. But isn’t there something suspiciously neat about that figure? Eight, after all, is a third of 24, the number of hours God chose to include in a diurnal cycle. The eight-hour day was the great victory of the labor movement. “Eight hours’ labour, eight hours’ recreation, eight hours’ rest,” as the Welsh socialist Robert Owen had it—a third of the day for our bosses, a third for our bodies, and the remaining third for ourselves. Can it be that our biological needs align so precisely with our political achievements and with the rotation of the spheres? 

Nah. The eight-hour sleep session, it turns out, is as much a creation of modernity as the eight-hour workday. Evidence from both history and psychology suggests that eight consecutive hours of sleep—the great unattainable dream of every anxious office worker and overburdened parent—is itself an uncomfortable compromise that crams our physiological requirements into a tiny container, suffocating an essential part of our humanity in the process. 

The historian A. Roger Ekirch has uncovered a pattern of references to “first sleep” and “second sleep,” or “morning sleep,” in sources from Homer and Plutarch to John Locke. Until the spread of artificial light in the 18th and 19th centuries, it turns out, our ancestors slept in two shifts of roughly four hours each, with a period of wakefulness in between. That interval was a peaceful time, a time for contemplation and reflection and maybe copulation. “Usually, people would retire between 9 and 10 o’clock only to stir past midnight to smoke a pipe, brew a tub of ale or even converse with a neighbor,” Ekirch wrote. “Others remained in bed to pray or make love.” 

The scientific evidence suggests that our biology is better adapted to what’s often called “segmented sleep” than to our own efficiently consolidated slumber. In the early 1990s, the psychobiologist Thomas Wehr tried depriving test subjects of light for 14 hours a day, then allowed them to sleep for as long as they liked. He found that “their sleep episodes expanded and usually divided into two symmetrical bouts, several hours in duration, with a 1-3 h waking interval between them.” During that interval, Wehr’s subjects achieved a state of unusual serenity, which he attributed to elevated levels of prolactin, the pituitary hormone associated with breastfeeding and sexual afterglow. 

In other words, there is a natural sleep rhythm that we have largely abandoned, one that sustained our ancestors for millennia, and it includes a gently blissful opportunity for reflection or meditation or prayer or sexual intercourse, and all you have to do to achieve it is to set aside an additional two or three hours of every day. 

Clark Strand, the author of Waking Up to the Dark, calls on us to recognize the value of that nighttime interval of wakefulness: “an hour in the middle of the night where peace was there for the having ... a nightly blessing.” 

“I’ve been following this sleep pattern since I was a young child,” Strand told me. “I lived down South where there was a little less light pollution at night. I was waking up in the middle of the night at 9 or 10 and slipping out the door and going for a walk.” He maintained his bimodal sleep habits as a Buddhist monk, and now he savors the darkness at his home in the rural Catskill Mountains, where there are no streetlights. (He had a more difficult time as a magazine editor in New York.) Strand describes these periods of nightly wakefulness as “a lost state of consciousness that was once a human birthright.” When people meditate or pray the rosary, he believes, “they’re trying to cultivate darkness, that sort of space where their mind isn’t a slave to calculated thinking or to the culture, where the body can be at peace and the mind can retreat within itself.”

But can those of us who live in cities—magazine editors in New York, say—reclaim those nocturnal hours? The eight hours of work and the eight of recreation already mount a nightly assault on our eight hours of rest, stealing an hour for our email inbox and another for our Netflix queue. Can we really set aside another two or three hours without bulbs or screens, to reflect and relax and, perhaps, rut? It sounds lovely, and all you have to do to achieve it is to go to bed at 8 every night. And if you like the idea of having sex during that moony interlude you’ll have to get your spouse on the same schedule—in which case, who in your household is earning a living? Capitalism ruins everything. Good night.

Read more from The Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

Flame Retardant Mattresses – FAQ

by exampleuser @ SleepLily

Flame Retardant Mattresses – Your questions, answered. Having a fire in the home is a nightmare scenario. In 2015 alone, there were 365,500 house fires an estimated $7 billion dollars in direct property damage. Don’t forget about the destructive emotional cost that comes from having your home and sense of security destroyed by flames. Thankfully,... Read more »

The post Flame Retardant Mattresses – FAQ appeared first on SleepLily.

CPAP Camping: 6 Stupid Simple Ways to Use a CPAP Off The Grid [3 min]

by Jonathan Prichard @ Insider Living

Love to tent camp, but need a CPAP? Don’t let your machine keep you from enjoying the outdoors! Here are six options for tent camping safely and comfortably when you need to use a CPAP machine. Stay at a campsite with electricity – Lots of sites offer electricity, and then all you need is an extension…

The post CPAP Camping: 6 Stupid Simple Ways to Use a CPAP Off The Grid [3 min] appeared first on Insider Living.

How to Buy a Used Mattress

How to Buy a Used Mattress


eBay

Brand new mattresses can be relatively expensive, and finding the right one for your comfort and style can require a substantial amount of research. Price, quality, brand name, and warranty are all issues...

Mattress Disposal and Recycling

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

With all the millions of mattresses being sold annually worldwide it’s wonder where all of these used mattresses cease to be worthy at the end of their life cycle. I used to have an image of huge refuse sites with stacks of rubbish and piles of mattresses. In the US, this is no longer the case as it was some decades ago. However, in many places across the world, a landfill site is certainly where old mattresses still do tend to expire, piled high in corners of tips where they take up space and cause unnecessary harm to the environment.

The post Mattress Disposal and Recycling appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Top 5 Reasons to Get a New Mattress

by Mattressdept @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

Are you thinking about buying a new mattress? If it has been on your list of things that you want to buy, there are several good reasons that you should think about getting one from 2 Brothers Mattress in Utah. In addition to helping you...

The post Top 5 Reasons to Get a New Mattress appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

Can a Used Mattress Cause SIDS?

Can a Used Mattress Cause SIDS?


Consumer HealthDay

A study makes that claim, but some doctors are skeptical

Sleep Habits: 61 Interesting Facts About Sleep [2017 Infographic]

by Jonathan Prichard @ Insider Living

It’s no secret… Many of us have poor sleep habits. In fact: As I type this sentence, my clock says it’s 1:27am here in Colorado.   I’ve gotta be up in 6 hours! Yikes! 🙂 Over the past month, my research team here at MattressInsider.com has been digging up some really interesting sleep facts that…

The post Sleep Habits: 61 Interesting Facts About Sleep [2017 Infographic] appeared first on Insider Living.

MRC launches Illegal Mattress Dumping Compensation Program in California

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

MRC has just launched a program to help mitigate costs of collecting illegally dumped mattresses in California communities. This program allows agencies responsible for the collection of illegally dumped mattresses from the public right-of-way, including California local governments, certain permitted solid waste facilities, and authorized solid waste operations to receive payment from MRC for the collection of […]

The post MRC launches Illegal Mattress Dumping Compensation Program in California appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

A New Look at the Sleepless Brain

A New Look at the Sleepless Brain

by Rachel E. Gross @ The Drift

Why did Slate start a sleep blog? Find out here.

For decades, Michael Jackson had struggled to fall asleep at night. But in 2009 the pop singer was preparing for his worldwide comeback tour, and he couldn’t afford to be at anything less than 100 percent. Desperate for sleep, he convinced an unscrupulous physician to give it to him synthetically in the form of an anesthetic so strong that it sent him almost immediately into a “druglike coma.” At first, Jackson would wake up feeling refreshed. But the nightly injections conferred only the shadow of true sleep, with none of the deep, dream-filled REM cycles that his body needed. Soon he was fading fast, his mind and mood slipping away. Within two months Jackson was dead of an overdose. If that hadn’t killed him, doctors later testified during his wrongful death trial, he would have died of sleep deprivation.

Jackson’s is a particularly dramatic case. But his struggle for oblivion rings true to anyone who has dealt with insomnia. “I’m for anything that gets you through the night,” Frank Sinatra once said, “be it prayer, tranquilizers, or a bottle of Jack Daniel’s.” If you have insomnia, you’ll understand this sentiment, and you’re not alone: Regular sleep eludes up to 15 percent of the population, making insomnia the most commonly diagnosed sleep problem in America.

Fortunately, the nighttime affliction is becoming steadily less mysterious—at least from the perspective of neuroscience. While insomniacs toss and turn, researchers are finally starting to understand this elusive disease. As it turns out, chronic insomnia may be more hard-wired into our brains than we had thought, and indicative of larger differences that separate the brains of the sleepless from those who so effortlessly enter the land of dreams.

In 2014, Rachel Salas, director of ambulatory sleep services at Johns Hopkins Center for Sleep, tested how quickly insomniac patients could learn a simple motor task. Given that their brains were depleted of fuel, she reasoned, they’d probably do worse. Instead, they did far better. “Their brains were more plastic, more adaptive,” Salas says. It wasn’t the sleep deprivation: It was that their brains simply processed information faster, whether or not they had gotten enough sleep. In fact, other studies have found that insomniacs have heightened levels of the stress hormone cortisol and higher overall brain metabolism, whether they were sleeping or awake.

“It’s like a light switch that’s always on, a car that’s always running” is how Salas describes the insomniac brain. Her findings add to the mounting evidence that insomnia is not just something that happens at night—the insomniac brain exists in a constant state of hyperarousal.

That might sound, at first, like an unexpected benefit for the sleepless. But don’t be fooled. If a car’s always running, it eventually empties the tank. And without gas, you can’t shift into high gear when you need to. Sleep-deprived patients may have been able to handle small tasks with aplomb, “but when you give them something more complicated, that’s where the breakdown comes,” says Salas. One second, everything’s fine, and the next—Chernobyl. (The nuclear meltdowns at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, as well as the Challenger space shuttle disaster, have all been linked to human error due to sleep loss.)

The problem goes beyond not sleeping. Even when they do manage to conk out, insomniacs don’t enjoy the rejuvenating effects that others do. In 2014, Swiss researchers analyzed the brainwaves of good and bad sleepers trying to fall asleep. In those with the most trouble staying asleep throughout the night, researchers found faster brain waves even while they were asleep. They had never entered deep sleep, with all those dreamy REM cycles that are so key to memory formation, concentration, and having a not-awful mood the next day. “They were almost like you would see in people who are awake,” says Salas. In what’s been referred to as paradoxical insomnia, these tortured souls could sleep all night and still wake up feeling like they hadn’t gotten a wink.

Alas, the more we learn about insomnia, the more we realize how truly harmful it is. You could count the negative repercussions of insomnia like sheep: Studies show that a good night’s sleep is key to forming memories and strengthening cognitive skills the next day. Insomniacs suffer major deficits in complex cognitive processes, including working memory and attention shifting. Sleep deprivation weakens immunity and increases your chance of work-related errors and traffic accidents. Throwing off your body’s normal circadian rhythms can put you at risk for higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and stroke. Prolonged trouble sleeping is associated with depression, bipolar disorders, and other mental health problems.

But there’s hope. It used to be that insomnia was treated as an afterthought, a secondary effect inextricably tied to other maladies like work stress or a particularly traumatic event. But for those with chronic insomnia, there isn’t always a clear root cause to address. “Although roughly 80 percent of those with major depressive disorder have insomnia, in nearly one half of those cases, the insomnia predated the onset of the mood disorder,” reads a recent review in the New England Journal of Medicine. So in 2013, the DSM-5—the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—moved insomnia disorder into its own primary category. Now physicians can better address insomnia head on, based on frequency and duration, independent of other psychiatric or medical disorders. As Salas puts it: “It’s taken less of a backseat.”

Hopefully that invigorated approach can serve as some comfort to insomniacs, rather than just more fodder to fret over when they find themselves awake at 4 a.m.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

Beware of Used Mattress and Return Fee Rip Offs

Beware of Used Mattress and Return Fee Rip Offs


SleepPassport.com

The truth about a new vs used mattress. Plus, how to try a new discount luxury mattress in your home for 75 days without return fees. Click here

How to Tell If Your Used Crib Mattress Is Safe

How to Tell If Your Used Crib Mattress Is Safe


The Spruce

Wondering if a used crib mattress is a good idea? Get the scoop on second-hand mattresses, and find out if your own hand-me-down mattress makes the cut.

aaghbugs on "buying a used mattress"

by aaghbugs @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

You can get an effective and comfortable encasement for $35-$50 dollars depending on the size of the mattress.

Otherwise I don't know what else can be effective. Even though my mattress was definitely infected, I couldn't find any bed bugs in my mattress or box spring, nor could my PCE (thus my landlord wouldn't pay for treatment until I caught a bug).

Freezing doesn't work and you'd need to heat the mattress to 130 degrees at its core for 10-15 minutes for that to work.

“It’s Like When You Meet … The Creature!”

“It’s Like When You Meet … The Creature!”

by Laura Miller @ The Drift

We get it from our mother. She was locally famous for the long, elaborate, and profoundly nonsensical conversations you could have with her while she slept. My dad liked to break out the reel-to-reel tape recorder with its little microphone (this was back in the day) and play the results later to general hilarity. There’s a particular laugh I know well and can recognize in my siblings—the hard, helpless, slightly panicky laugh that comes when someone reveals all the crazy things you’ve done in your sleep. It is the laughter of the comprehensively embarrassed.

My mom only talked, but we walked, too, and because there were five of us, the Miller household had many an unquiet night. On the way to the fridge for a glass of milk, you might run into my younger brother, shambling around on a “mission”; once I nearly tripped over him as he lay crouched like a sniper monitoring a potential target. Another night, as I was reading in bed, my 6-year-old sister sauntered into my room, sat down cross-legged on the floor, and grilled me tenaciously about my upcoming plans for a trip to the bank. Being only 10 myself, I had no such plans, and like most sleepwalkers and –talkers, she grew more and more irritable as I explained her error. What that feels like is this: You’re propelled forward, gliding on the perfect confidence of dream logic, and this naysayer is impeding you, generating friction and snags that threaten to drag you into a befuddled wakefulness. It makes you mad.

Most people who sleepwalk as children grow out of it, but my somnambulism continued into adulthood. I only got out of bed if I was alone, but my sleep-talking wasn’t the drowsy, eyes-closed mumbling you see in the movies. I’d sit bolt upright (“like Dracula in his coffin,” as an ex put it), stare at my companion, and say all kinds of weird shit. “You were trying to tell me something,” my college roommate reported, “and you were having such a hard time. You said, ‘It’s like … it’s like … it’s like when you meet … The Creature!’ ” One morning over coffee, my boyfriend gave me a level look and said, “Let’s talk about why you were kneeling in bed last night and scratching at the wall like an entombed lady in an Edgar Allan Poe story.”

All this sounds pretty gothic, but in truth, the dream world of my sleepwalking—at least what I can remember of it—is depressingly administrative. Every so often I’ll still find myself trying to put on a coat over my nightgown in the middle of the night, with the fading conviction that I need to perform some shadowy task right now. My mother’s sleep-talking had a recurring theme: that the pupils in the children’s swimming class she was supposed to teach at 1 p.m. had thought it was at 1 a.m. instead and were now lined up with suits and towels outside the house in the dark, their pale faces gazing in our picture window. My brothers’ sleepwalking lives seemed to be governed by issues of combat and strategy; we dreamed of errands.

If we dreamed at all. Once I tried to research the phenomenon, but it turns out that sleep researchers don’t know that much about sleepwalking for the simple reason that, unlike insomnia and sleep apnea, it’s not a disorder that drives many people to sleep clinics. (Probably the most common complaint is sleep-eating.) On a few, very rare occasions, sleeping people have performed complex actions (such as driving a car) or even committed crimes (such as murder). Last month, a 19-year-old girl in Denver woke up 9 miles from her home; she’d sleepwalked the entire distance in pajamas and socks.

One thing is evident: Somnambulism and somniloquy do run in families. A scientist assured me that sleepwalkers aren’t actually dreaming because dreams only occur during REM sleep, at which time the motor cortex shuts down to keep the body from acting out the dream. (This explains why dreamers may suddenly feel as if they are paralyzed; in fact, they are.)

But if my sleepwalking self isn't dreaming, then what does she think she’s doing? I’ll never know. I might hear the echo of her thoughts as I rocket up toward consciousness, but despite occupying the same physical space, we can never actually meet. This seemed most clear to me at the moment I emerged from one of my oddest nocturnal escapades. I found myself standing at my desk writing a letter by hand. I’d only gotten as far as the salutation: “Dear Rainman.” What did it mean? Who was she trying to communicate with? Certainly not me. I could feel her resentment of me every time I moved to reclaim our shared body. It’s a little like living with a ghost, and not an especially friendly one. So maybe this is a gothic tale after all.

Read more from the Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

Mattress Sets

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

For more than 20 years Call A Mattress leads in value, quality, price and selection in mattresses. It's in our name!

The post Mattress Sets appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Considerations Before Buying A Mattress

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

Mattress shopping is not the time for impulse buys. A new mattress can run into the multi-thousands of dollars and will be bulky and difficult to move. Since you’ll also be spending up to a third of the next five to ten years asleep on one, it’s very important to take the time to understand the mattress world and your own needs so you can feel great about your purchase. According to the Huffington Post, a bad mattress will affect your ability to sleep. For example, if you consistently feel hot or uncomfortable during the night, you’ll likely toss and

The post Considerations Before Buying A Mattress appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Free local classified ads

Free local classified ads


Gumtree

Find used mattress ads in our Other Furniture category from Sydney Region, NSW. Buy and sell almost anything on Gumtree classifieds.

President’s Day Mattress Sales 2018

President’s Day Mattress Sales 2018

by Sleep Sherpa @ The Sleep Sherpa

It’s that time of year again when not only do traditional mattress and furniture stores roll out some of their best mattress deals of the year but you will also find great deals among the online mattress brands as well. Below is a roundup of the President’s Day Mattress sales. This page will be updated […]

The post President’s Day Mattress Sales 2018 appeared first on The Sleep Sherpa.

phantom1 on "buying a used mattress"

by phantom1 @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

Buying a used mattress is asking for trouble. Please don't do this, bbs are a misery and you really don't want to have to deal with them....

A rowdy boy almost made her quit teaching; then he became her son

A rowdy boy almost made her quit teaching; then he became her son

by Katie DeLong @ FOX6Now.com

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana — Fourth-grader Jerome Robinson was the bane of his young teacher’s career. “At certain points, his behavior got so bad,” Chelsea Haley told CNN, “I thought ‘I can’t do this anymore. I can’t be a teacher.'” Haley joined Teach for America to make a difference in a low-income school. She did not expect to encounter a tough boy like Jerome. She definitely did not plan on adopting him and his little brother. “I never thought I’d be […]

Ocean State Waves Hello to Bye Bye Mattress

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

On Sunday, Rhode Island becomes the third state in the nation with a free recycling program for mattresses and box springs. The program, known as Bye Bye Mattress, has established free collection points in cities and towns across the state. Rhode Island residents can find their nearest participating collection site or recycling facility at www.byebyemattress.com […]

The post Ocean State Waves Hello to Bye Bye Mattress appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

Selling A Used Mattress - The Do's And Dont's For A Successful Sale

Selling A Used Mattress - The Do's And Dont's For A Successful Sale


The Sleep Judge

Have you ever cringed when browsing the for sale ads and come across the offloading of a used mattress? I know I have, but buying a used mattress is often an economical, and affordable buy for many people. If you are replacing your mattress for any reason, or are moving and don't feel like hauling large, bulky items along, selling your mattress is definitely something you may want to consider. Buyers and sellers alike should be aware of the proper way to present your item, as well as any laws that may pertain to such an item. The care of your mattress should be first and foremost, and below I'm going to provide you with some simple tips to get your money's worth out of a mattress sale. Used Mattresses: The Dos and Don'ts For a Successful Sale Mattress Age and Brand Mattress Care Selling Venue State Laws Cost Preparing for Sale Cleaning Pictures Honesty Household Conditions Conclusion Mattress Age and BrandMost mattresses have a life of 10 years or more, and if you are looking to

Our Voila Hybrid Mattress Review for 2018

by Sarah Cummings @ The Sleep Advisor

The post Our Voila Hybrid Mattress Review for 2018 appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

How to Choose a Mattress: The No-Fluff (Pun Intended) Mattress Buying Guide

by Katie Taylor @ Insider Living

I think you’ll agree with me when I say… Shopping for a new mattress sucks. There are half a dozen types of mattresses, each with their own nuances like size, material, firmness, and more. Not to mention the dozens of retailers offering different prices and hundreds of brands claiming to be the best. We get…

The post How to Choose a Mattress: The No-Fluff (Pun Intended) Mattress Buying Guide appeared first on Insider Living.

All About Different Mattress Thickness

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

One of the many common attributes you will see listed when reading through any mattress reviews or specifications is not just the name, brand, or material, but also the stated mattress thickness, which is sometimes specified as its height. Many people may mistakenly believe that the different mattress sizes correlate to their height, but this isn’t necessarily true – you can get thick Twin and thin Queen, and vice versa. In this article we touch a little more briefly upon size. Why Mattress Height Matters Mattress height plays a large role in how the bed appears in the room. Will

The post All About Different Mattress Thickness appeared first on Choose Mattress.

The Nighttime Routines Of Highly Successful People

by Jonathan Prichard @ Insider Living

Sleep is the one thing that we all need to survive, yet despite this requirement, we know very little about maximising our nighttime routines for success. In this article, we are going to go in depth on the subject of sleep and look at the nighttime routines of highly successful people, so that you can…

The post The Nighttime Routines Of Highly Successful People appeared first on Insider Living.

Co-Sleeping 101- The Ultimate Guidebook

by Jonathan Prichard @ Insider Living

Changing diapers, pacifying a crying baby, tracking first solid food, all milestones to take note of – these are just some of the things a would-be parent would love to learn more about.  Maybe you’ve also wondered if sleeping in the same room or bed with your child is safe and healthy? If so, you…

The post Co-Sleeping 101- The Ultimate Guidebook appeared first on Insider Living.

The Last Bedtime Story You’ll Ever Need

The Last Bedtime Story You’ll Ever Need

by Lisa Wong Macabasco @ The Drift

Forget counting sheep and/or sleepy herbal teas. The newest weapon in the age-old battle between parents and kids over bedtime is a self-published picture book titled The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep, a text that guarantees it will knock out children using linguistic trickery to induce a quasi-hypnotic sleep state.

Promising “a new way of getting children to sleep,” the book claims to be “an innovative and groundbreaking type of bedtime story that uses sophisticated psychological techniques,” including repetition, emphasis on yawning, subliminal suggestions, and frequent use of the child’s name to nudge young ones toward slumber. “Every word has been carefully chosen to create the magic, as parents sometimes call it,” says Carl-Johan Forssén Ehrlin, the book’s author.

Written in consultation with psychologists and therapists and imbued with these clinically proven methods, the book asserts that kids will not only fall asleep faster but also sleep more calmly. It’s a bedtime story for the FiveThirtyEight set. It’s Goodnight Moon on steroids.

Self-published in 2011 by Ehrlin, a Swede who has written on leadership and personal development, the 24-page book was translated into English in 2014. Fueled by breathless reviews that claim the book produces miraculous results, it rocketed this summer to the top of Amazon’s best-seller list in both the U.S. and the U.K., becoming the first self-published book to go to No. 1. Within just a few months, it has been published in over 40 languages.

Ehrlin attributes the success in large part to word of mouth: “Helping your child to go to sleep can sometimes be a real challenge—parents have told me that it took up to five hours each day before they tried The Rabbit Who Wants to Go to Sleep,” he said. “When you find a solution to your big problem, then you are really happy to tell all your friends that have similar challenges.”

The story itself is unremarkable—Roger the Rabbit goes on a journey to fall asleep, meeting friends like Uncle Yawn, Sleepy Snail, and Heavy-Eyed Owl along the way—and almost every news article mentions how tedious it is. The illustrations are equally trivial and seem to have been done by a somewhat talented grade-schooler. The intro even advises adults reading it aloud that they can skip the illustrations completely and just read the text. As Kirkus Reviews wrote in their coverage, “That this title … became an international bestseller says a lot more about the desperation of parents of sleepless children than it does about the quality of the book.”

Still, it has all the key elements most conducive to sleep. Umakanth Khatwa, director of Sleep Laboratories at Boston Children’s Hospital, points to three reasons for the books success: First, it’s a simple story that toddlers and preschoolers can relate to. Second, children identify with the sleepy characters, which pushes them towards sleepiness. But, most important, any magic powers the book possesses are derived from the way it’s read. “It’s the power of hypnotic language,” Khatwa says.

Detailed instructions direct adults to stress bolded words, read italicized sentences slowly and calmly, yawn at particular times, and read through to the end even if the child falls asleep before that to ensure the child is fully asleep. Example (using Lisa for the child’s name):

Relax your feet, Lisa. Roger and you do as Heavy-Eyed Owl tells you and now you relax your feet. Relax your legs, Lisa. Roger and you do so now. Relax your entire upper body Frankie. Roger and you do so, now. Relax your arms Lisa. Allow them to be heavy as stones. The Rabbit and you do so, now.
You are relaxing your head and allowing your eyelids to be heavier Lisa, just letting them relax. Roger and you are relaxing deeply. Now.

Khatwa calls it “a form of gentle hypnosis.” A common reason that children have trouble sleeping is anxiety, and he says this method of reading can soothe that anxiety and make them relaxed. Once that happens, children will fall asleep and stay asleep. And although there are many other books that aim to help children sleep, Khatwa says he hasn’t seen a book with such emphasis on the way it’s designed to be read.

But why has this book caused such a commotion? Hasn’t it always been true what Tom Selleck says in Three Men and a Baby—when he reads an article about a bloody boxing match to baby Mary in a soft, soothing storybook-reading voice—that it’s not what you say but the tone of your voice?

Probably, Khatwa says. “With the right story, using this technique of stressing certain words, intonations, characters that resemble sleep and alleviate anxiety, it should work. It is nothing particular to this story.”

In fact most parents are already doing a version of this when they read to children before bed. But Khatwa says that for kids who have more trouble falling asleep, they need “a more refined technique, like this book, which may help more than the regular reading books, in a gentler way.”

Khatwa says he finds himself recommending the book a few times a month, as an option to pediatric patients without any medical condition who have trouble falling asleep because they’re anxious. While he’s quick to note that the book won’t work on all children, he says that almost anything that’s not medication is worth trying, and these books tend to work best on preschoolers and early grade-schoolers.

It’s also important to use the book in concert with other methods to induce sleep, like having a consistent bedtime, maintaining a pre-bed routine, and avoiding things that will stimulate the mind, like sugar or TV, right before bedtime. Reading the book after feeding a kid a bunch of sugar or before his or her natural bedtime will have little, if any effect. And don’t read the book on electronic devices, which emit a light that can increase alertness.

Does the voracious demand for this book indicate that children are more anxious today than in earlier eras? Not so, says Khatwa. What’s different now is that parents are more aware of children’s anxiety when it’s present. That’s because many parents today are both working and they need their sleep to get up for work. Children who have trouble sleeping take up more of their time that could be allocated to sleep or other tasks—not to mention causing anxiety for the parents themselves. Unfortunately, there’s not yet a similar knockout book for mom or dad. 

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

5 Things Your New Mattress Should Have

by Mattressdept @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

Shopping for a new mattress might seem like a stressful thing—there are dozens of different bed types to choose from these days, and seemingly hundreds of options and price points. Next time you are ready to go to 2 Brothers Mattress, here are a few...

The post 5 Things Your New Mattress Should Have appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

Welcome to The Drift

Welcome to The Drift

by J. Bryan Lowder @ The Drift

There are few things in life better than drifting off to sleep. After a long day of toil and tribulation, retreating to the comfort of bed, and then to the sweet release of unconsciousness—perchance to dream?—is a blessing, one of the most natural joys human beings can experience. And yet, despite its apparent simplicity, sleep has become incredibly complicated. Many of us have difficulties getting to it, and others have trouble staying there. We constantly receive tips (usually unsolicited) on what’s ruining it or which props we should use to do it better, and the debate over how much of it we need never seems to end. Beyond mechanics, sleep continues to fascinate us with its mystery—what happens while the lights are out upstairs? Why do some people talk and walk when they should be still? Why do some of us wake up screaming? Sleep is such an important part of the human experience that it regularly creeps out into our culture, even our language. One thing is certain: You should never sleep on sleep.

The Drift, a pop-up blog that will run in Slate from now through early Decemeber, will be a space for considering sleep from as many vantage points as there are threads in a fine set of sheets. We’ll look at the latest science and health advice, but we’ll also examine sleep as it engages with our art and entertainment as well. We’ll look at products meant to help us sleep, and reevaluate etiquette meant to help us do it more politely. We’ll hear personal stories of the sandman’s strangest habits, and maybe even eavesdrop on a dream or two. The goal, overall, is not to cover all of sleep—there aren’t enough hours in the night—but simply to wallow in it for a bit. We hope you’ll join us in appreciating the profound ways in which sleep shapes our lives, both under the covers and beyond. 

Week One

Down With Spooning! J. Bryan Lowder rails against the indignities of the pre-sleep horizontal embrace and advocates instead for concious cuddling, an approach to intimacy that's altogether more comfortable and dignified.

My 9-Year Love Affair with Melatonin Mark Joseph Stern reports from almost a decade of shut-eye with the help of the natural sleep aid. And while it was the quest for rest that got him started, it's the crazy dreams that keep him coming back.

A New Look at the Sleepless Brain Rachel Gross stays up late looking at the most current neuroscience research on why some people just can't get to sleep—and how their brains may differ from those who can.

Week Two

“It’s Like When You Meet … The Creature! Laura Miller relates what it's like to come from a family of sleep walkers and talkers.

When Did People Start Moving Fast Enough to Experience Jet Lag? Joshua Keating looks at the history of traveling faster than time! ... or at least fast enough that sleep schedules get confused.

Don't Sleep on "Don't Sleep on." The Phrase Is Evidence of the War on Sleep Katy Waldman, Slate's words correspondent, explores the origins of the expression, which has shifted mightly in its meaning since the time of Henry VIII.

The Eight-Hour Sleep Session Is Not What You Need Gabriel Roth rouses us from the slumber of conventional wisdom, arguing that instead of a "full night's sleep" what we really need are a few extra hours in the day ... and a smarter sleep schedule.

Dreaming in the Cloud Greta Weber reports on attempts to record our dreams and make sense of the mysteries of the collective human unconcious. But can dreams really be translated into "big data?"

Week Three

What’s Actually Happening When Part of Your Body Falls Asleep? Claire Landsbaum explains the biological reasons for those pins-and-needles in your arm—and reveals whether "sleeping" body parts can become dead ones.

We Need to Talk About Our Dreams Amanda Hess takes on the taboo against talking about our dreams in public and argues that the reason we consider "dream talk" boring may have more to do with cultural conditioning than objective truth.

The Art of the Public Nap Ian Callahan brings us Eric Leleu's striking images of public snoozing in China, revealing a juxaposition of human vulnerability and common space rarely seen in the West.

Pubescent Boys Hear a Lot About Wet Dreams. But They’re Not As Common As You Think Mark Joseph Stern investigates a pillar of teenage male sexuality—and discovers that sticky sheets are hardly the universial experience we have been lead to believe.

In Search of the Perfect Podcast to Help You Fall Asleep Laura Miller guides us through the podcast shelves in pursuit of the most dulcet voice to carry us into dreamland.

Week Four

I Slept All Night in a Sensory Deprivation Tank. This Is My Story. Seth Stevenson embeds himself in a device that shuts out essentially all sensory stimuli. But does total peace and quiet really equal better sleep?

How Gross Is Your Mattress? Claire Landsbaum takes a magnifying glass to our mattresses to see if, after a few years, they are really as nasty as bedding purveyors claim. The answer? Shudder...

Down With Alarm Clocks! L.V. Anderson exposes alarm clocks for what they are: A capitalist trap designed to violently align our bodies with the demands of the marketplace. Is there any hope of returning to the organic risings of our agrarian forebearers? Don't count on it.

Sweet Dreams Are Made of This Slate staffers discuss the possible meanings of their recurring dreams. 

Bedroom Revelations: Things You Learn When You Sleep Next to Someone Couples and folks who have otherwise slept near each other reveal the wild and charming things we do while unconscious.

The Creepiest Book of the Year Imagines a World Without Sleep Dan Kois interviews Adrian Barnes, author of a novel about what might happen if all of humanity forgot how to sleep.

Week Five

Should You Steep Before Sleep? J. Bryan Lowder dives into the steamy industry of so-called "sleepy teas"—herbal sachets that promise to help you nod off. But do they really work?

Sleep Trackers Promise to Improve Our Sleep. They Only Made Me Feel More Helpless. Josh Brogan considers the dubious promises of "sleep trackers," apps and tools designed to help you avoid the dreaded "sleep debt." He is not impressed.

Years Ago, We Decided That Young Doctors Need More Sleep. The Plan Might Have Backfired. Jordan Weissmann questions the seeming common sense that young doctors might perform better if their historically long shifts are limited to allow for more sleep.

The Last Bedtime Story You’ll Ever Need Lisa Wong Macabasco reveals the hypnotic power of The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep, a best-selling children's book that promises to knock out even the most trenchant bedtime fighters.

A Wet Awakening Jonathan L. Fischer often wakes up in a puddle of his own drool. This is his quest to understand why—and to keep it from happening again.

Week Six

Sonata-Allegro Snooze J. Bryan Lowder considers the widespread practice of using music (especially classical music) as a sleep aid. Is such a repurposing disrespectful? Or is it a valid use for art?

From Sleeper Cells to Sleeping Around: A Brief History of an Extremely Versatile Word Katy Waldman explores the wide and varied uses of the word sleep for things other than sleeping.

Should You Tell Your Friend You Dreamed About Them? An Interactive Adventure! Andrew Kahn and J. Bryan Lowder offer a little dream interpretation and advice in the form of a charming interactive game.

Watching People Live Stream Themselves Sleeping Can Be Dull, Creepy, and Strangely Sweet Willa Paskin watches the strange Internet video genre of sleep-streaming and finds it more engaging that you might expect.

Our Casper vs. Loom & Leaf Mattress Comparison

by Valerie Dunn @ Sleep Authority

 

The post Our Casper vs. Loom & Leaf Mattress Comparison appeared first on Sleep Authority.

Amazon keeps sending mystery packages to this couple – and they want it to stop

Amazon keeps sending mystery packages to this couple – and they want it to stop

by Katie DeLong @ FOX6Now.com

ACTON, Mass. – The mystery Amazon packages started arriving in October, and now a Massachusetts couple just wants it to stop. Mike and Kelly Gallivan, of Acton, told The Boston Globe it was funny at first. “Then it got to be weird,” Kelly said. The boxes arrive without any packing slip or return address, and the products inside are mostly cheap gadgets, such as hand warmer phone chargers, tent lights, water glass humidifiers and cellphone cases. “We just don’t know […]

Simmons Mattress Sets

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

The post Simmons Mattress Sets appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Room Alterations for a Great Sleep

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

At 2 Brothers Mattress, our goal is to help provide you with the materials to get the perfect night’s sleep every night. Our mattresses come in a wide range of prices, styles and comfort arrangements to make sleep a simpler and more relaxing process for...

The post Room Alterations for a Great Sleep appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

Our Aviya Bed Review: Is This America’s Favorite for 2018?

by Sarah Cummings @ The Sleep Advisor

The post Our Aviya Bed Review: Is This America’s Favorite for 2018? appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

3 Reasons You Should Include a Bigger Mattress on Your Wedding Registry

by The Daily Dozers @ The Daily Doze

Your wedding is just around the corner, and you’re slowly but surely checking through your mile-long to-do list. One of the most exciting things to do before the big day is to think through all the things you and your future spouse will need to equip your new life together. From dishes and flatware to […]

The post 3 Reasons You Should Include a Bigger Mattress on Your Wedding Registry appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Nobugsonme on "buying a used mattress"

by Nobugsonme @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

Although encasements can work, they can also rip. You're taking a chance with a used mattress even if you encase it.

California - Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

California - Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council


Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

Learn more and stay up-to-date with California's mattress recycling program, key state legislation, events and much more.

Mattress Recycling Press Conference in Los Angeles

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

Los Angeles, CA – As of December 30th, California became the second state in the nation with a statewide recycling program for used mattresses and box springs. The program, known as Bye Bye Mattress, allows California residents to drop-off used mattresses at participating collection sites and recycling facilities for free. Today, government officials, municipal and […]

The post Mattress Recycling Press Conference in Los Angeles appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

10 Creative Uses for Old Mattresses

10 Creative Uses for Old Mattresses


HowStuffWorks

More than 20 million mattresses that fill up American landfills each year. Don't add even one more to the pile. Instead find a more creative way to dispose of your old mattress and keep it out of the landfill.

Sheriff’s deputy who lived with bullet in head after 1994 Rowland Heights shooting dies from injuries

Sheriff’s deputy who lived with bullet in head after 1994 Rowland Heights shooting dies from injuries

by Brian Day @ San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Steven Belanger was a 29-year-old, 7-year veteran of the sheriff's department when he was shot and severely wounded in December of 1994. He died from his injuries on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018.

                            Mattress Recycling | MassDEP

Mattress Recycling | MassDEP


Energy and Environmental Affairs

Learn about how to recycle mattresses and box springs, and what the state is doing to help.

Why the mom of a child with a facial deformity fought to take down just 1 cruel tweet

Why the mom of a child with a facial deformity fought to take down just 1 cruel tweet

by Megan Pospychala @ FOX6Now.com

CORNELIUS, North Carolina — Natalie Weaver knows there aren’t many little girls like her daughter Sophia. The nine-year-old has been through enough surgeries to last several lifetimes. Though she can’t talk, she uses her eyes and makes little sounds to communicate with her family. Weaver says that although her conditions sometimes cause her pain, Sophia is a happy, strong little girl. And yet, every day people tell Weaver that Sophia should die. Or, even worse, that she should never have […]

From Sleeper Cells to Sleeping Around: A Brief History of an Extremely Versatile Word

From Sleeper Cells to Sleeping Around: A Brief History of an Extremely Versatile Word

by Katy Waldman @ The Drift

Over 7 billion people on earth, a recommended eight hours a night: You’d think the word sleep would have enough to do without straying into the lands of metaphor. But like other basic human actions—to “drink in,” to “eat up,” to “screw over”—sleep has accrued its share of figurative meanings. A scavenger hunt through the English language finds it lingering in sleepy towns (because they’re quiet) and sleeper cells (because they’re temporarily inactive). Don’t sleep on sleep, lest you miss one of metonymy’s sleeper hits.

The concept of sleep has taken repose in metaphors since at least antiquity. For Homer, Death was the brother of Sleep, and both divine twins carried the slain Sarpedon off the battlefield. But the first figurative use of the English word sleep dates back to a ninth-century poem called “Crist III.” That verse, one-third of a sacred trio opening the Exeter Book of Anglo-Saxon poetry, has the anonymous author prophesying of Judgment Day:

“They shall wake from death, out of the ancient earth, in terror, the sons of warriors, the race of man, unto the judgment. They shall bid arise out of firm slumber suddenly.”

Slumber, here, is a poetic translation of the Old English term slæpe. Elsewhere in the same poem, slæpe has an ambiguous, though clearly negative, definition: Paradise promises “life without death … no hunger nor thirst, neither sleep nor heavy sickness, nor burning of the sun, nor cold, nor care.”

And yet, if you’re going to die, you’d be lucky to fade into the mist of peaceful nonexistence that is conjured by sleep. Spenser’s mild pastoral “The Shepheardes Calendermakes a character anticipate that gentle time when “my last sleepe Doe close mine eyes.” In Walter Scott’s 1810 poem “Lady of the Lake,” the “sleep that knows not breaking” represents a calm release from the moil and chaos of life (which is presumably full of ruptures). Even today, to put a creature to sleep means to kill it softly and humanely, out of mercy. “I had to have Allard [a beloved car] put to sleep,” jokes a character in K.A. Saddler’s 1966 novel Gilt Edge. “She started coughing up oil … I couldn’t bear to see her in agony.”

By now the metonymic connection between sleep and death has calcified into cliché; the two conditions look the same (just ask Romeo) and make roughly equivalent demands on our social skills. (Sleep talkers and dead people are both sorry conversationalists.) Shakespeare was a huge exponent of the death-sleep entanglement: “Our little life is rounded with a sleep,” said Prospero, to which Hamlet replied, “to sleep, perchance to dream.”* Robert Frost’s “miles to go before I sleep” remains one of the canon’s most evocative expressions of world-weariness: a deeper exhaustion than a generous night of shut-eye can sate.

Conversely, some sleep metaphors are all about feeling alive. The sleep usage “implying sexual intimacy or cohabitation,” as the Oxford English Dictionary delicately phrases it, first appeared in 900 A.D., with the publication of the Doom Book, a code of laws compiled by Alfred the Great that drew heavily on the Bible, particularly Moses’ Ten Commandments. It featured an Old English translation of the interdict from Exodus 22:7–11: “If anyone deceives an unwedded woman and sleeps with her, let him pay for her—and have her afterwards as a wife.” From there, the metaphor flourished in Chaucer (“An elf queene shal my lemman be/ And slepe vnder my goore”) and John Webster, who wrote in The White Devil, “Fare you well, Our sleeps are sever’d.” Which meant: Affair’s over.

A language blogger who goes by Steepholm noticed that the King James Bible favors “lie with” over “sleep with” in its erotic passages, reflecting a preference that prevailed from the 14th century to roughly 1750. (Of course, sleep was innocent enough even in 1794 to permit poet Robert Southey to tread “the sacred ground/ where heroes, kings, and poets sleep around.”) By 1819, the tides were turning, and wordsmiths like Shelley were describing sexual intrigue in sleepy, but not soporific, terms: “Cristofano/ was stabb’d in error by a jealous man,/ Whilst she he loved was sleeping with his rival.” The use of sleeping around to suggest promiscuity first appeared in literature in 1928, with the publication of Aldous Huxley’s novel Point Counter Point: “ ‘Sleeping around’—that was how he had heard a young American girl describe the amorous side of the ideal life, as lived in Hollywood.”

To find the origins of sleeper cell, meanwhile, you’d need to jump forward 40 years, to a 1968 article in the New York Times Book Review. “Government intelligence,” writes the critic, “soon encounters the well-entrenched sleeper cell, now roused to very undrowsy action.” The phrase rocketed up in frequency around 1975, during the paranoid years of the Cold War, and fell as the threat began to deflate, around 1982. Post 9/11, sleeper cell began an ascent that makes the ’70s spike look like a pin prick.

On the other hand, some metaphorical uses of sleep haven’t stood the test of time. A sleepy hollow used to be “a type of comfortable deep-upholstered armchair.” Now it is solely the setting of horror movies. A fruit that was beginning to rot was said to be entering its sleepy phase; a worn and tattered piece of fabric was extremely sleepy; cream that “assumes the appearance of froth” through and through was sleepy cream. In 2015, the metaphorical range of sleep runs much smaller—a modest arc from sex to death. Of course, the same could be said of our little lives.

*Correction, Dec. 9: This article originally attributed the Shakespeare line "Our little life is rounded with a sleep" to Puck. It was said by Prospero.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

How To Get Rid of Bed Bugs in the Mattress: The Ultimate Guide (2018 Edition)

by Jennifer McBride @ Insider Living

Bed bugs are creepy little critters who love mattresses and their favorite food – YOU! With the potential to pick up the stowaways wherever you travel and bring them back to your own home and bed, they can arrive from anywhere.  And once they make themselves at home, they are notoriously difficult to get rid…

The post How To Get Rid of Bed Bugs in the Mattress: The Ultimate Guide (2018 Edition) appeared first on Insider Living.

We Need to Talk About Our Dreams

We Need to Talk About Our Dreams

by Amanda Hess @ The Drift

Talking about your dreams is the bore by which all other bores are measured. As a matter of conversational good graces, the issue is considered closed. Western cultural tastemakers have reinforced the taboo for more than a century at least. “Tell a dream, lose a reader” is a truism first attributed to Henry James and later boosted repeatedly by Martin Amis. YA king John Green recast the prohibition for a new generation in his 2008 bildungsroman Paper Towns: “Nothing is as boring as other people’s dreams,” his teen protagonist complains when the parents start talking theirs over breakfast. And in a July Inside Amy Schumer sketch, America’s current comedy darling threw her weight behind the cause. Schumer starred in a parody commercial for a faux emergency hotline dubbed “ListenAlert,” where operators are paid to listen to boring people drone on and on—within reason: “We will not listen to your dreams,” Schumer warned. “We are not saints.”

It’s time we dispensed of this tired taboo. We’re all spending two hours a night, on average, dining with the dead, parading pants-less through our high school hallways, and screaming noiselessly until our teeth fall out. We should be allowed to talk about it once in a while.

An array of sunny social science findings support the cause. The psychotherapist Ann Faraday, who attempted to popularize dream interpretation in the 1970s, posited that “the dreaming mind has an uncanny power to pick up feelings, observations, and reactions which have passed us by during the day” and that parsing dreams could help reveal “inner attitudes and prejudices that influence waking behavior below the level of conscious awareness.” People who share their dreams with their partners report higher levels  of relationship intimacy. Old folks asked to join a dream discussion group for a 2009 nursing study rated the experience as “pleasant,” “interesting,” and “meaningful,” especially because it was so rare—never before had they had an outlet for talking about the weird stuff they contemplated in sleep. Dream analysis can help researchers understand how people living near the Gaza Strip process trauma or guide doctors toward a more accurate diagnosis for patients suffering from psychosis: A study published last year in the journal Scientific Reports found that people with schizophrenia use markedly different speech patterns in describing their dreams than patients with bipolar disorder. Or as the researchers put it, “The Freudian notion that ‘dreams are the royal road to the unconscious’ is clinically useful, after all.”

Freud, by the way, is largely to blame for the current anti-dream climate. In a September article for the BBC, University of Leicester historian Shane McCorristine noted that dream discussion declined in Britain just as Freudian psychoanalysis became fashionable. Freud’s 1899 tract The Interpretation of Dreams recast dreams as signs of deep and shameful sexual desires (his theory that everybody secretly wants to kill one parent and boink the other was introduced here). Later, neurological researchers sourced dreams to synapses firing at random in the brain, allowing the scientifically minded to write off dreams as totally and utterly meaningless.

But neuroscience isn’t completely at fault for our dream-phobia—there’s also a cultural component. Deirdre Leigh Barrett, a Harvard University psychology professor and the editor in chief of the peer-reviewed journal Dreaming, told me that dreams are often discounted in cultures where strictly logical perspectives prevail. “I think in our culture, when you talk about personal things, they should be important. When talking about unimportant things, they should be shared, general interest,” she told me. “We consider dreams neither.” Other cultures don’t have the same hang-ups. (The anthropologist Waud Kracke provides a brief primer on dream talk across cultures, from the Barbadian view of dreams as intense “studying” to the Sambia of New Guinea who have different traditions for discussing dreams in political and personal contexts). Accepting dream talk, says Barrett, requires a respect for “a more intuitive mode of thought.”

This goes a long way toward explaining the generalized Western suspicion of “dream talk”—that mode is historically undervalued around here. Perhaps, then, this taboo is self-justifying: We don’t talk about our dreams, so we never get good at talking about our dreams, so we dismiss all dream talk as boring and useless. Researchers have found that people who belittle the importance of dreaming have a harder time recalling their own dreams—the stigma against dream discussion has the effect of erasing the material entirely. It takes practice to remember the most interesting bits of a dream, to determine which dreams are worth discussing out loud (some are more provocative than others), and to learn never to give listeners the full play by play of the night’s events (dreams are not structured like stories, so don’t try to string together a plot). In The Interpretation of Dreams, Freud compared a dream to a rebus: “If we attempted to read these characters according to their pictorial value,” he wrote, “we should clearly be led into error.” But tease out the meanings of its symbols, and the dream “may form a poetical phrase of the greatest beauty and significance.”

For a 2013 episode of This American Life, reporter Sarah Koenig set out to challenge her mother’s list of conversational taboos. Koenig’s mom has no patience for idle chatter about diet, sleep, menstruation, traffic, the common cold, or of course, “your dreams—nobody cares about your dreams.” So Koenig took mom and mic to a New York City “dream club” where members assembled bimonthly to parse each other’s subliminal experiences. When the participants began describing the images and scenes they’d dreamed up, “I could not, for the life of me, focus on what people were saying,” Koenig herself admitted. But once the dream club started interpreting the meanings of these things, it “felt like solving a riddle,” she found. Even her mother admitted to perking up when the dream got translated from an idiosyncratic experience to a communal event. As she put it: “It was the analysis that brought them life.”

Only in its retelling can a dream become relevant to the waking world. The ritual is so satisfying, even Henry James couldn’t resist its pull. One night, several years before his death, a sixtysomething James awoke with a jolt. He’d dreamed he’d been transported back to boyhood, where he wandered the great rooms of the Louvre until a spectral monster began pursuing him through its halls. Only upon awakening did James appreciate the formative nature of those childhood museum visits; only then did he realize that his creative mind had evolved in the shape of the very architecture of the Louvre. He wrote a memoir about it, A Small Boy and Others. His retelling of the nightmare is its most-talked-about scene.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

Sleep And Your Immune System

by Sleep Sherpa @ The Sleep Sherpa

Sleep and Your Immune System Are you having trouble getting proper sleep? You should find a solution as soon as possible as lack of sleep has been linked to a wide range of physical and mental health problems, including those that are caused by an impaired immune system. Because it is designed to protect us […]

The post Sleep And Your Immune System appeared first on The Sleep Sherpa.

Maintaining Good Posture When Sleeping

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

Most people always note to keep the back straight. Mothers, teachers, even drill sergeants keep repeating the mantra. It’s the most familiar phrase people hear when their superiors want them to look respectable. Posture makes a person look strong and confident. The thing is, they...

The post Maintaining Good Posture When Sleeping appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

paulaw0919 on "buying a used mattress"

by paulaw0919 @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

Putting the mattress outside will not kill bed bugs if the mattress is infested. The center of the mattress would need to be WAY below zero for many many weeks to kill bedbugs.
Personally, I totally understand the financial issue, but I would NEVER purchase ANYTHING used after suffered many months of an infestation.
My advise, buy an air mattress (prices range $30-$100 on average depending on quality) and save my $$ until I can buy a new one. Even after $$ is saved for a new purchase, due to delivery trucks having bed bugs now, I would encase the new mattress in a high quality bed bug encasement before it's brought into the home.

Best Temperature for Sleep

by Sleep Sherpa @ The Sleep Sherpa

Best Temperature for Sleep As the temperature begins to dip, most of us love to curl up in our warm beds at the end of each day. However, despite having the coziest duvet, falling to sleep can be a real problem as the nights get colder. You will be surprised to know that your bedroom […]

The post Best Temperature for Sleep appeared first on The Sleep Sherpa.

51 Feng Shui Experts Share Their Bedroom Decorating Secrets

by Jennifer McBride @ Insider Living

Oftentimes you come home tired and stressed after a long day of work and you can barely wait to relax and stop all the hustle. Your home is a refuge where you spend precious time with your family. More than the overall home, your bedroom is a place for intimacy and rest. If you are…

The post 51 Feng Shui Experts Share Their Bedroom Decorating Secrets appeared first on Insider Living.

California - Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

California - Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island


Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

Learn more about California Mattress Recycling laws, find out how to sign up for program updates and explore mattress recycling resources.

My 9-Year Love Affair With Melatonin

My 9-Year Love Affair With Melatonin

by Mark Joseph Stern @ The Drift

Why did Slate start a sleep blog? Find out here.

Falling asleep is hard work. After spending a day solving the complex puzzles of daily life, you are expected to lie down, turn off the lights, and quiet your whirring whirlwind of thoughts within a few minutes. In my early years, this process was fraught with frustration and despair: I would lie awake for hours, bored and desperate, staring at the ceiling, wondering why I couldn’t shut off my brain. I tried all the hippie methods—meditation, breathing exercises, even goddamn Sleepytime tea—but none of it eased me into slumber.

Then, around age 15, I discovered melatonin. I first spotted the drug on the shelf of a health food store—the kind that sells vegan dog food and horny goat weed. Melatonin struck me as marginally less scammy than most supplements, so I bought a bottle and took my first dose that night. Thirty minutes later, I was overcome with the drowsy feeling kids get after a day at the beach. Five minutes after that, I eased into sleep.

And that’s when the real fun began.

There is a fair amount of research documenting the effectiveness of melatonin supplements as a sleep aid. But there is relatively little research to explain why it gives you trippy, totally bonkers dreams. This phenomenon is well-documented on the Internet but largely ignored by scientists, presumably because crazy dreams are not (yet) therapeutically relevant. Still, almost everybody I know who takes melatonin confirmed what I discovered on that first night: You will never dream as vividly as you do on melatonin.

These dreams, I should note, are not just normal dreams kicked up a few notches in intensity. They are a different type of dream—more akin (I am told) to a lysergic hallucination than a typical oneiric vision. My melatonin dreams are bursts of energy and excitement: sometimes fast-paced and fragmented, sometimes lucid and evocative. I have woken up from a melatonin dream with a deeper understanding of a friend or family member, or a great insight into a persistent problem, or that relieved, glazed sensation of stepping off a roller coaster. I wake up feeling refreshed, with yesterday’s thoughts neatly compressed, sorted, and filed away.

Why does this happen? Nobody really knows. Melatonin’s basic mechanism is simple: The brain’s pineal gland naturally secretes melatonin, a hormone, when darkness falls—signaling to the body that it’s time to sleep. Melatonin supplements mimic this process, tricking the brain into thinking it’s bedtime. They also help regulate our circadian rhythm, the internal clock that tells us when to sleep and when to wake up. Switching time zones and consuming caffeine can seriously disrupt these rhythms, and some people are just cursed with a faulty body clock. Melatonin supplements keep circadian rhythms healthy and regular. Our natural supply of melatonin may also diminish as we age, a problem supplements can help reverse.

But what about those nutty dreams? At least one study has tentatively confirmed that melatonin increases “dream bizarreness”—especially in women, who may remember their dreams better than men. Researchers speculate that melatonin contributes to the quality and quantity of REM sleep, when most dreams occur. Taking extra melatonin, then, could kick our REM cycle into hyperdrive, giving us longer, richer, more memorable dreams.

Before you rush off to melatonin dreamland, a few caveats: The supplement is extremely safe in the short term, but its long-term effects are basically unknown. The usual dose—1 to 3 mg—can be multiplied exponentially with no apparent side effects. (That dream bizarreness study gave participants a whopping 250 mg dose and reported no issues.) But no longitudinal study has yet confirmed that melatonin supplements are completely safe to take for years. The fear here is that melatonin supplements could somehow diminish our brain’s natural supply of the hormone, getting us hooked on the pills for sleep. There is also some very tentative research showing that the positive effects may peter off after a few months of use.

But that doesn’t square with my experience: The stuff still works gangbusters for me nine years into my experiment. And when I absentmindedly miss a dose, I don’t lie awake in restless agony: At most, my sleep is marginally less satisfying. If I ever do feel hooked on melatonin, I’ll probably feel compelled to quit. Until then—or until my wild dreams turn pedestrian—I’m happy to keep playing human guinea pig.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

How to Clean A Mattress: The Ultimate Guide [2017]

by Jennifer McBride @ Insider Living

Let’s face it: You very rarely [ok…pretty much never] clean your mattress. The fact is… You’re probably only reading this because… …you’ve been faced with a sudden spill, stain, or bug problem and you need a quick solution. What you will learn: How to Maintain a Clean Mattress? How to Clean Dust Mites From a…

The post How to Clean A Mattress: The Ultimate Guide [2017] appeared first on Insider Living.

Size Matters: Upgrade Your Valentines Day on a Budget

by The Savvy Savers @ The Daily Doze

Worried your funds won’t stretch far enough to give your loved one a Valentine’s Day to remember? Don’t sweat! Mattress Firm is here to share our favorite thoughtful ideas and gifts that won’t break the bank… or your partner’s heart. Here are five tips our Mattress Firm team is sure will help upgrade your Valentine’s […]

The post Size Matters: Upgrade Your Valentines Day on a Budget appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Superior Importers recalls mattresses sold exclusively through Amazon.com

by BedTimes @ BedTimes

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, New Brunswick, New Jersey-based Superior Importers voluntarily has recalled about 6,200 mattresses that failed to meet the mandatory federal flammability standard for mattresses, posing a fire hazard. No injuries have been reported in connection with the mattresses. The recall involves Basic 6-inch and Basic 8-inch Home Life […]

The post Superior Importers recalls mattresses sold exclusively through Amazon.com appeared first on BedTimes.

Our Tempurpedic vs. Loom & Leaf Mattress Comparison

by The Sleep Authority @ Sleep Authority

 

The post Our Tempurpedic vs. Loom & Leaf Mattress Comparison appeared first on Sleep Authority.

America Recycles Day #IWillRecycle Sweepstakes

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

Have some fun when you drop your mattress off for recycling. This year, Keep America Beautiful, in celebration of America Recycles Day, is offering a chance to win one of four Apple Certified Refurbished iPad mini3s. You can enter by posting a photo of yourself recycling with the hashtag #IWillRecycle and #Sweepstakes on Twitter or […]

The post America Recycles Day #IWillRecycle Sweepstakes appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

MRC Marks Millionth Mattress Milestone

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

The Mattress Recycling Council’s Bye Bye Mattress program announced that it has recycled its one millionth mattress. This means that Bye Bye Mattress has diverted nearly 25,000 tons of materials from landfills in the three states that MRC serves – California, Connecticut and Rhode Island. Each state enacted its own mattress recycling law to reduce […]

The post MRC Marks Millionth Mattress Milestone appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

I Slept All Night in a Sensory Deprivation Tank. This Is My Story.

I Slept All Night in a Sensory Deprivation Tank. This Is My Story.

by Seth Stevenson @ The Drift

Two years ago, I wrote for Slate about sensory deprivation tanks, those contraptions that let you float in skin-temperature water, enveloped in darkness and silence. While reporting that piece, I heard an intriguing rumor: One of the float tank enthusiasts I spoke with claimed to know a person who slept in a tank at night—every night. In fact, this person had become so accustomed to sleeping inside a tank, my source said, that she could no longer fall asleep outside one. When she traveled, she was forced to find a tank at her destination and beg the owner to make it available in the wee hours.

I couldn’t shake this thought from my mind. I’d adored my midday floating sessions. So restful and meditative, I’d come out feeling like I’d ingested a cocktail of sedatives and ’shrooms. And that was just an hour in the tank. Might a long night’s journey into the void be even more restorative and trippy?

I emailed Gina Antioco, owner of Brooklyn’s Lift/Next Level Floats, to ask if she’d let me sleep in one of her tanks overnight. She was game. What’s more, she said, she’d been meaning to try this again herself. She’d given it a go once before but hadn’t managed to fall asleep. She wondered if the second time might be the charm.

I arrived at Lift at about 11 p.m. on a weeknight. Gina told me we needed to wait for a couple floaters to finish before she could lock the entrance door, shut down the lobby, and let the sleepover begin. “One of the guys in the tanks right now is a DJ,” Gina explained. “He plays sets at a major soundcamp at Burning Man. I want him to compile some music to play over the speakers in the tanks when the session is beginning or ending.” The DJ at last emerged, dazed and relaxed, in the manner of all first-time floaters. He said he was envisioning music that sounded like a forest, alive but calm. We bid him goodbye and then Gina began to program the tanks for our overnight.

In a float tank, you lose all sense of time. A minute can feel like an hour, and vice-versa. I told Gina I didn’t want to be in the tank with no clear end point—wondering if I’d been forgotten and it was now 25 years later. I’d fail to relax unless I knew I’d be awakened at a set time. Because of some quirk in the tanks’ control systems, it turned out the latest Gina could program the music and lights come on in the tank was 5:30 am. I said that’d be fine. To be honest, I had grave doubts I’d make it that long.

Over the years, I’ve slept in all manner of ungainly milieus. An Indian train bunk with a colony of roaches scuttling next to my head, a boat at anchor in violent swells, the concrete steps of a friend’s apartment building when I arrived late and drunk and he wasn’t yet home. When I moved into my first apartment, I neglected to obtain a mattress before nightfall, so I slept on the hardwood—cheekbone to floor wax—and still caught a good six hours of nod.

Yet there’s one scenario in which I can’t sleep for more than about a minute at a time. I just can’t snooze on my back. I’m a stomach sleeper. And for obvious reasons, stomach sleeping won’t work when you’re floating in water. The concentrated Epsom salts in the tank make you so buoyant that there’s no danger you’ll accidentally roll over in your sleep. So I wasn’t scared of drowning. But I was scared I wouldn’t be able to drift off.

I said goodnight to Gina, entered my float room, stripped naked, showered off, killed the lights, and stepped into the tank. Soon, I remembered the many joys of floating. My brain slowed down. My thoughts became sparse, and wispy, and then disappeared altogether. I heard disembodied voices, including someone singing the Cars song “Drive.” I contemplated my place in the universe and also Ric Ocasek’s place in the universe, which seemed all the more poignant because he hadn’t been the lead singer on that song and I wondered if he ever felt sour about that.

At one point, I thought I saw bright lights. But there were no lights in the tank. I must have been dreaming—confirmed by the fact that I came to with a start, my limbs twitching. It was just a split-second of slumber. It had happened once before in a tank, on a sleepy afternoon. But in neither case had I achieved full-on, REM shut-eye.

I had no clue if it was 1 a.m. or 3 a.m. One floater I’ve met told me that the first time he tried it, he was supposed to float for only one hour, but the guy forgot about him and left him in there for several hours. It was a transformational experience. “I can’t describe it to you now in a way that wouldn’t devalue its meaning,” he said to me. It seemed he now divided his life into the eras before and after that long sojourn in the tank. Would this happen to me? Would I emerge a changed person?

I began to get restless. I was exhausted, given the late hour, yet I was still awake. And my physical discomfort was growing. I yearned to flip over onto my tummy so I could sleep for real. I contorted myself as far sideways as I could. I had my left eye submerged. Some salty water trickled into my nose and burned my left nostril.

I tried to wrangle myself into a comfortable position, locking an arm behind my head and crossing one foot beneath another. But I always reverted to my standard, belly-up ragdoll look, limbs akimbo. The water is so thick that it locks you into place as though you’re molded in Jello. I felt like Damien Hirst’s shark.

Suddenly, some hokey zither music blared over a set of speakers I hadn’t known were there. This was my alarm. And guess what? It had woken me up. I’d been totally out. I have no idea how long I was under, but it was long enough to count as real sleep.

I emerged, showered off, put on my clothes, and turned on my phone. It was only 4:30 a.m. Something had gone wrong, and the alarm went off an hour early. I’d been in the tank for a total of about five hours, some solid portion of which was spent asleep. I thought of stripping down and getting back in, to see if I could fall asleep again (less nervous about the whole thing now that I’d tried it), but the zither was blasting and the tank had begun some sort of auto-filtration sequence. So I left. On my way out, I saw Gina asleep on a couch in the lobby. She must have given up long before. I locked the entrance door behind me.

As I walked home through pre-dawn Brooklyn, I considered whether I should try this again sometime, with no set alarm—see if I could make it through the night. But the notion made me squirm. It was a struggle to fall asleep in the tank, my nose aflame with salt, my spine unhappy. I will absolutely float again. But the difference between an afternoon and a midnight float is like night and day. 

Read more from The Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

What is a Used Mattress Worth?

What is a Used Mattress Worth?


Unboxed

Would you ever purchase a used mattress? We found that less than 10% of people would buy a used mattress. This makes determining the worth difficult.

Waterbed Terminology Explained: Simple Word Guidance for You

by Douglas Belleville @ STLBeds

Many people decide to ditch their mattress and box spring to return to a waterbed for its natural comfort and contouring to your body. This may seem like an easy task; however, the market has evolved to include many new items. Learning the waterbed terminology will help you to make decisions on a new waterbed.…

In Search of the Perfect Podcast to Help You Fall Asleep

In Search of the Perfect Podcast to Help You Fall Asleep

by Laura Miller @ The Drift

“I fall asleep to your voice on my phone every night!” I once heard a guest gush to Terry Gross. At the time, I was listening to Fresh Air via the antiquated technology of radio waves and never caught his name. But the idea stuck. The audio-on-demand nature of the podcast means that smartphone owners now have a near-infinite number of ways to meet a very particular need: filling our heads with pleasant burblings as we drift loose of consciousness at the end of the day. I used to read myself to sleep, but sooner or later I’d have to reach over to turn off the bedside lamp, giving my brain just enough agitation to summon up the things I should have done that day, but didn’t—not to mention all the stuff I shouldn’t have said, but did. Better to fill every mental vacancy with someone else’s voice, as long as it can be set to switch itself off in 30 minutes.

One problem, though: Terry Gross is a great interviewer on a show that books fascinating guests. Likewise, the authors of the books that used to put me to sleep were striving for the exact opposite effect. Most culture intends to be interesting, and in an age of so many competing entertainment options, people are trying harder than ever to seize and hold my attention.

Enter the mini-industry of sleep-inducing podcasts. I don’t mean self-hypnosis, which urges the insomniac listener to relax, clear her mind, imagine some idyllic setting. Instead, a sleepcast—unlike every other pinging, flashing, animated thing on your smartphone—aims to bore.

The ruler of this drowsy kingdom is Drew Ackerman, aka Dearest Scooter, whose podcast Sleep With Me typically ranks somewhere in the Top 50 or so of the most popular subscriptions on iTunes. He also produces Game of Drones, which promises to “fight insomnia with dull recaps” of what is widely regarded as one of the most exciting TV series around. Then there’s Sleep to Strange, in which Ackerman “uses progressive boredom via silly stories to help adults fall asleep.” The titles of these stories include “Former FBLA Reporter Impeached by Model UN,” “A Little Water Globule Trembling With Joy” and “The Geeseman of Oaksterdam.”

Ackerman delivers this material in a rambling, hazy mutter that some observers have characterized as sounding “stoned.” He is very good at this, as a phalanx of five-star iTunes reviews from grateful sleepers attests. Sleep With Me always features a preamble before Ackerman launches into one of his soporific tales. The effect is a bit like being hit on the head by one of those giant mallets employed in old Warner Bros. cartoons; I have yet to make it to the actual story before conking out. Lately, Sleep With Me episodes have kicked off with Ackerman talking about the podcast’s iTunes rating, merch (you can buy T-shirts on his website), and the need for listeners to take some kind of survey. This is by far the most potent segment of the recordings. What could be more narcotic than listening to someone else’s entrepreneurial patter?

What Ackerman most sounds like is one of those unkempt, earnest guys you might have known in college, the sort who was almost always entirely sweet and you would later hear had moved into a yurt in Oregon. However, there remains the slight possibility that such a guy will go off the rails and do something truly terrible, and this keeps Sleep With Me from being the perfectly relaxing sleep aid I desire. Don’t get me wrong: It does the job. But a few times I’ve woken up again while the recording was still playing and been troubled by a nagging sense of dread. Although Sleep With Me is spectacularly boring, it is not as cozy and soothing as I would like.

There are surprisingly few alternatives, in that there are basically two, and both have hit upon a mother lode of lulling material that has, until now, gone untapped: the literary short story. Bedtime Stories: Classic Tales for Sleepy Grownups features fiction in the public domain by the likes of Anton Chekhov and Edith Wharton, but the goofy enthusiasm of narrator Parker Leventer (a yoga teacher and actress) sends too many ripples across the stories’ placid surfaces. Besides, most short stories old enough to be used for free in a podcast are dangerously entertaining; I adore Saki, for example, but laughter seldom segues into slumber.

There are insomniacs who swear by the New Yorker’s fiction podcast, in which celebrated authors read the work of other celebrated authors from the magazine’s archives. Readers beyond counting have complained about the tedium of the classic “New Yorker story”—beautifully written but maddeningly uneventful, exactly the qualities to promise a quick trip to the Land of Nod. But no matter how mild the material chosen, with the New Yorker podcast you still never know who’s going to be reading it to you. The voice might grate or whine or lapse into the unspeakably irritating singsong cadence so many writers have adopted for public readings.

At last I discovered Miette’s Bedtime Story Podcast, narrated by a rather mysterious Welsh-sounding lady who is very partial to James Joyce. This turns out to be an ideal combination. Joyce’s stories aren’t boring, but neither do they make a bid for their reader’s attention. You have to come to them, and if you only make it halfway there, you will find yourself idling in a tranquil realm where lovely sentences patter down on you like a warm, soft rain. The gentle lilt of Miette’s voice is what the babysitters of paradise sound like as they murmur their charges into dreamland.

Read more from The Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

Our Amerisleep vs. Saatva Mattress Comparison for 2018

by Lisa Allen @ Sleep Authority

The post Our Amerisleep vs. Saatva Mattress Comparison for 2018 appeared first on Sleep Authority.

Years Ago, We Decided That Young Doctors Need More Sleep. The Plan Might Have Backfired.

Years Ago, We Decided That Young Doctors Need More Sleep. The Plan Might Have Backfired.

by Jordan Weissmann @ The Drift

For most of modern medical history, the process of training to be a doctor could have been mistaken for some diabolical experiment in sleep deprivation. Hundred-hour workweeks, complete with regular all-night shifts, were standard for young hospital residents—in fact, the health care profession largely looked at such grueling schedules as the only efficient way to teach its craft. As one article in the Journal of Graduate Medical Education put it, “residency training could be likened to an apprenticeship that had features of indentured servitude.” Servants never get much shut-eye.

Eventually, though, many doctors and members of the public began to worry that sleeplessness among residents might pose a risk for patients. Fatigued, inexperienced M.D.s, they argued, were more prone to potentially deadly mistakes. In recent years, the governing body that oversees graduate medical training has set rules limiting the hours that just-out-of-med-school physicians can work.

The problem? The regulations don’t seem to be doing patients much good. They may even be backfiring.

The effort to get fledgling physicians tucked into bed dates back to the 1984 case of Libby Zion, an 18-year-old woman who checked into New York Hospital with a 103-degree fever and spasms; she died hours later after being cared for by the residents on duty. Fatefully, she happened to be the daughter of New York Daily News columnist Sidney Zion. After learning that the young trainee who had treated his child had been on call for almost 24 hours, he sued the hospital and began writing about the hazards posed by overworked medical residents, which drew more press attention. A grand jury investigation of the case failed to yield any criminal indictments but did lay blame for Zion’s death on residents’ exhausting work routines as well as a lack of supervision by senior doctors. Following the recommendation of a high-profile commission, by 1989, New York became the first state to limit residents’ hours.

Eventually, the reforms went national. In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the nonprofit that oversees residency programs, followed New York’s lead and barred residents from working more than 80 hours a week or spending more than 24 straight hours on duty caring for patients. It also guaranteed them the relative luxury of one day off every week.

To some advocates, that schedule was still too brutal. A high-profile clinical study found that medical interns made far fewer errors when their shifts topped out at 16 hours instead of the standard 24-to-30 hours. A 2005 study showed that residents who worked a heavy rotation on call suffered cognitive impairment on par with a blood alcohol level of 0.05 percent (high enough that you probably wouldn’t want to drive). A 2007 article in the Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety surveyed the evidence and concluded, “Residents’ traditional work shifts of 24–30 consecutive hours unquestionably increase the risk of serious medical errors and diagnostic mistakes and have been shown in a national cohort study to increase the risk of harmful and fatal medical errors.” With pressure building, the accreditation council imposed a new rule cutting back residents’ hours further. Starting in 2011, first-year interns could only work 16-hour days, at max. After that, they had to go home.

Yet by the time this new round of reforms was solidifying, researchers had already started to notice something discouraging: Although the 2003 rules seemed to have made life more bearable for residents—several papers found physicians were suffering less burnout—a pair of major studies concluded that they still weren’t improving patient outcomes. There were a few theories why, including the possibility that hospitals were simply ignoring the rules. But as Darshak Sanghavi explained in a lengthy 2011 New York Times Magazine article, many suspected another problem was at play: While doctors might have been better rested, the new rules prevented them from overseeing their patients’ care from start to finish. Sanghavi wrote:

Shorter shifts mean doctors have less continuity with their patients. If one doctor leaves, another must take over. Work-hour reductions lead to more handoffs of patients, and the number of these handoffs is one of the strongest risk factors for error. As a result, many hospitalized patients are at the mercy of a real-life game of telephone, where a message is passed from doctor to doctor — and frequently garbled in the process.

Since Sanghavi’s piece was published, evidence about the effects of resident work-hour limits on medical outcomes has, if anything, become more worrisome—especially when it comes to surgery. Studies comparing teaching and nonteaching hospitals have found that the 2003 reforms were associated with an increased risk of complications for patients undergoing neurosurgery, spinal surgery, and coronary artery bypass grafts, as well as treatments for fractured hips.

“The surgical community in particular is concerned about this and feels duty hour restrictions have impaired continuity of care,” says Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. The rules are a problem for surgeons in particular, Bilimoria told me, because young doctors find themselves forced to hand off patients in the middle of urgent situations—in the middle of an operation, for example, or while trying to stabilize them in the intensive care unit. Senior doctors, of course, get to stay on the case. But interns and older residents have to switch off, “and it’s simply because their clock is up and they have to leave,” he says.

As of now, it’s not clear whether the 2011 reforms that knocked intern shifts down to 16 hours are affecting quality of hospital care at all. A paper in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons didn’t find any relationship between the changes and patient outcomes. But we’ll know more once the results are published from the two large national studies that are using randomized trials to test the issue.

In the meantime, there are some signs that interns themselves may not be benefiting much from the latest changes. A 2013 study found that interns who started training after the 16-hour rule went into effect were statistically no less likely to experience depression and no more likely to feel a sense of well-being. They were also more likely to report feeling concerned about having made a serious medical error.

Ironically enough, they also didn’t seem to get much, if any, more sleep—just a statistically insignificant 12 minutes extra per night, on average.

Read more from The Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

Undercover Investigation: Used mattresses sold as new

Undercover Investigation: Used mattresses sold as new


WOAI

News 4 Trouble Shooter Jaie Avila shows you what you could end up taking home now that no one is doing a "bed check."

Pre-Owned Mattress Sets - Call A Mattress

Pre-Owned Mattress Sets - Call A Mattress


Call A Mattress

Call A Mattress has a huge supply of gently used mattress sets. We carry twin sizes, fulls, queens, and kings all gently used. Twins $49, Fulls $69

Best Cooling Mattress & Tips to Sleep Cool

by Taylor Jones @ The Drömma Bed

A comfortable cooling mattress is essential for a good night’s sleep.  According to the National Sleep Foundation, people sleep best in a room as cool as 60 – 69 degrees Fahrenheit. They suggest thinking of your bedroom as a “cool, dark cave.” Before sleep, the body’s core temperature drops. Increased core temperature at the wrong time disrupts the sleep cycle, so a mattress that is too warm can result in a raised body temperature, restlessness, and waking in the night.  So how do you choose which is best? Overall Tips for Finding a Cooling Mattress If you’re shopping for a mattress someone […]

The post Best Cooling Mattress & Tips to Sleep Cool appeared first on The Drömma Bed.

Our walking tour through mattress showrooms

by BedTimes @ BedTimes

BY BARBARA T. NELLES Beth English and I spent four days touring Winter Las Vegas Market last week. Scroll down to see a gallery of product images that we took, from creative angles. In the closeups, you’ll get an idea of some of the detailing that went into the latest crop of mattresses from a […]

The post Our walking tour through mattress showrooms appeared first on BedTimes.

Mattress pick-up in Ottawa

Mattress pick-up in Ottawa

by Mailyne @ who picks up used mattress ottawa – A Dream Lived Greener

Hey Ottawans, Recently I had to go through the process of getting a new mattress and discarding the old one. We had a king-size mattress that we wanted to save from the landfill and donate because it was in good condition so I called around. To no avail, no companies would pick it up because … Continue reading Mattress pick-up in Ottawa

Platform Beds vs Box Spring Beds

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

At the end of the day, we all need to sleep, right? That too on a comfortable bed! Nothing beats the feeling of getting into a comfortable bed and looking forward to a good nights sleep at the end of a hard days work. When it comes to beds, depending on the kind of comfort you need, you have many options to choose from, however the two most common types of beds to pick from are the platform bed or the box spring bed. Any idea which one you are using currently? Unless you have actively purchased one in the

The post Platform Beds vs Box Spring Beds appeared first on Choose Mattress.

A Wet Awakening

A Wet Awakening

by Jonathan L. Fischer @ The Drift

Every few weeks or so, I twitch awake in the middle of the night and find my face planted in a warm, viscous puddle about the size of a compact disc. Often I will be on my stomach, having rotated out of an initial side sleeping position and maneuvered my arm beneath my head as a kind of supplemental pillow. Perhaps because I am a mess of a sleeper—I sweat, I twist, I kick, and I occasionally snore—this moist disturbance doesn’t keep me awake. I simply flip over my pillow and plop back to sleep. Only after my alarm has roused me at the intended time do I realize that half my face is covered in sticky, malodorous saliva.

I am an occasional nighttime drooler. And it’s absolutely gross.

So why do I—and perhaps you!—drool? According to one paper in the journal Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology, drooling appears to result from a “dysfunction in the coordination of the swallowing mechanism, resulting in excess pooling of saliva in the anterior portion of the oral cavity and the unintentional loss of saliva from the mouth.” According to another paper, from the British Journal of Medical Practitioners, the excess production of saliva itself and the mouth’s inability to contain a surfeit of it can also be culprits. Many regular droolers have some kind of neurological impairment—perhaps they suffered a stroke or have cerebral palsy—and their drooling can be pretty severe, causing dehydration, odor, chapped skin, and other problems. My own drooling is merely annoying in comparison and only occurs when I’m asleep. There could be a few reasons for that.

I called up Christopher Y. Chang, an ear, nose, and throat surgeon in Warrenton, Virginia, who encounters patients with the same problem as mine. He explained that even if I am able to swallow the spit that collects in my mouth as I sleep, if it’s pooling in my cheek due to my sleep position, it could overflow. “The mouth is the path of least resistance,” he said. “The lips are right there.”

Luckily, most of Chang’s suggested courses of action are nonsurgical. If I came to his practice complaining about drooling at night, he’d suggest I try sleeping on my back rather than my side, which can allow saliva to pool. If I must be on my side—indeed, I must!—then I need to realize an open mouth could allow spit to escape. The problem there might be nasal congestion, which might be forcing me to breathe through my mouth at night. Deal with my sinuses, and I very well may solve my drooling.

What if that doesn’t work? “For some individuals who are really drooling even if there’s nothing wrong neurologically, we could do Botox injections into the spit glands” to slow the secretion of saliva, Chang says, but he’s only done it for patients who have suffered strokes or have some other disorder. Botox isn’t even the last resort: For exceedingly heavy droolers—almost certainly someone who’s been “neurologically devastated,” Chang says—removing the spit glands altogether is an option. For daytime droolers, researchers describe even more treatments, like undergoing “oral motor therapy” with a speech therapist, modifying one’s behavior with biofeedback, and surgeries even more extreme than the removal of spit glands. One paper describes tongue acupuncture as an “alternative or adjunctive” option for kids, noting that “[c]hildren easily tolerated the treatment with significant improvement of drooling and no complication,” but “the technical skill and experience of the practitioners is a marked obstacle for this technique.” I bet!

So what’s next? It’s been several weeks since my last drooling incident—which might be because I haven’t been having any trouble with congestion. My best shot for now may be making sure my nasal pathways are clear before bed. I also suspect I drool when the placement of my arm forces my mouth open, so I may need to change my favored sleep position. However I try to fix my drooling, I’d prefer to figure it out at home. I sincerely doubt Slate’s health plan covers tongue acupuncture.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

STATEWIDE MATTRESS RECYCLING PROGRAM DEBUTS IN CALIFORNIA

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

Allows In-State Retailers No-Cost Drop-Off at Participating Recycling Facilities Alexandria, VA – Today, California’s Mattress Stewardship Plan will take effect, making it the second state in the nation to launch a statewide recycling program for used mattresses and box springs. The program is administered by the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC), a non-profit organization created by the […]

The post STATEWIDE MATTRESS RECYCLING PROGRAM DEBUTS IN CALIFORNIA appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

Leesa vs Lull Mattress- What You Need To Know

by Frank Apodaca @ The Sleep Judge

The 5 Highest Rated Firm (Hard) Mattresses in 2018

by Sarah Cummings @ The Sleep Advisor

The post The 5 Highest Rated Firm (Hard) Mattresses in 2018 appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

The Art of the Public Nap

The Art of the Public Nap

by Ian Callahan @ The Drift

During his first trip to China in 2004, photographer Eric Leleu stumbled upon a fascinating cultural phenomenon. As he moved around Shanghai, he noticed people from different walks of life—businessmen, restaurant workers, the elderly, and children—napping in public. He had discovered, he realized, a common afternoon practice in a society that “wakes up early and works long days.” Leleu decided to capture the public napping in his photography.

“Employers nap as well,” Leleu told me. “It’s just a different perception of body rhythm. People go for a break when we go for a caffeine boost in the Western world.”

One month into his travels, Leleu had photographed enough nappers to compile an initial portfolio. “I did not chase them,” he insisted. “The ‘Dreamers’ came to me.” He encountered nappers so frequently that after four years, Leleu’s draft expanded into his first collection, appropriately titled Day Dreamers.

Originally from northern France, Leleu completed a master’s degree in economics. After graduation, he altered his life plan with a swift move to Shanghai, where he began pursuing photography full time.

With its ground-level views, Day Dreamers is a personal exploration of unconsciousness. Intimate yet bold, Leleu’s images interpret sleep as a powerful pause in rapid daily routines. Unaware of passers-by—including Leleu himself—his subjects defy the social world, answering a natural call to rest, relax, and restore.

“It was a funny process shooting them,” Leleu told me, “a jubilation. Most of them did not even notice I took a photo. Sometimes, other Chinese people saw me shooting someone sleeping and laughed. It seemed amusing for them as well.”

Occasionally, one of his “Dreamers” would wake up, drowsy and surprised to see a foreigner with his lens pointed in his or her direction. But by indicating his friendly intentions, Leleu would allow his subjects to usually fall back asleep. He kept the stills of the startled subjects, however, noting their potential for a future spinoff series, “Waking Up Dreamers.”

Comprising both landscapes and intimate portraits, the images in Day Dreamers share similarities in framing. I talked to Leleu about his style, namely his use of a low, planar vantage point.

“I like the power of frontally shot photographs,” he explained. “I started shooting the series from very close, focusing on faces with sometimes mouths opened. But I soon realized the context was just as interesting as the ‘Dreamer’ itself. So, I slowly stepped back to include more of the surroundings.”

Compared with his more recent projects, Leleu likes that Day Dreamers is “on the edges of blurry frontiers, between different photographic ‘drawers’: documentary, conceptual, street, and social.” Technically, Leleu’s use of color, shadows, and light are consistent across the series and convey the stark contrast of reverie against urban reality.

“My idea was to show another face of China,” he said, “a more tender face compared to the one described in mainstream media. Something more human.”

In his work, Leleu achieves a stunning vision of sleep. Typically considered a private function, this gallery of public napping offers a broader look at a basic need. In an exposed state, Leleu’s subjects find a fleeting moment of solitude—a place of peace shared by all humanity

To view more of Eric Leleu’s photography, visit his website

Idle Sleep Mattress Review

by Sleep Sherpa @ The Sleep Sherpa

The Idle Sleep mattress is a hybrid mattress that is 2-sided. That means you can sleep on either side and flip it to make it last longer. This is the first 2-sided hybrid mattress I have reviewed and so far I am very impressed with it.  The biggest reason for people switching to a new […]

The post Idle Sleep Mattress Review appeared first on The Sleep Sherpa.

How Gross Is Your Mattress?

How Gross Is Your Mattress?

by Claire Landsbaum @ The Drift

“After 8 years, an old mattress becomes a heavy weight, from pounds of dead skin, gallons of sweat, and millions of dust mites that accumulate inside it!” So claims an ad for the concerned Mattress Firm—your salvation is, of course, to purchase a fresh, unsoiled mattress from them. But is this true? Do our mattresses really suck up pounds and pounds of ick over the years?

Probably not pounds per se, but they do become … occupied. Even if you curl up to sleep solo, you’re not alone. Besides collecting the skin flakes, sweat, and oil you secrete while counting sheep, your mattress is also home to hundreds of tiny creatures called dust mites. The mites are very small (less than a millimeter long) and difficult to see with the naked eye. Their diminutive size means they can penetrate through most sheets to live out their entire life cycles in your bed.

“Every mattress is a crime scene in terms of how it gets inoculated with mites,” explained Glen Needham, a retired professor of entomology at Ohio State University. Dust mites might find their way to your bed by clinging to your clothes or even your beloved pet. “All you have to do is get a female dust mite to start laying eggs, and pretty soon you have a starter set going in your mattress,” Needham said.

Mites feed on the dead skin cells that we shed naturally in our sleep. Their mouths are designed like chopsticks in that they don’t open very far, so thin, protein-packed flakes of skin—Needham compared them to Pringles—are their ideal meal. Your body also emanates the humidity dust mites need to survive: Instead of drinking water, they have an apparatus that sucks moisture straight from the air, Needham explained. In other words, your mattress is a dust mite’s ideal habitat; when you go to sleep, you provide all the food, water, and warmth a mite could ever want.

A spokeswoman for Casper mattresses, a company so confident in its mattress design that it only makes one, speculated that spring mattresses are more susceptible to mite infestations because they have “more air pockets where dust and skin cells can accumulate over time.” But Needham postulated that foam mattresses might be even more attractive to mites, and a study on dust mites published in 2002 confirmed his suspicions.

“Most foam cells are closed cells, so mites can’t go down into the foam very far; but because of that they probably hold heat better,” he said. “They still trap skin scales, and they’re warmer, so I speculate that mite populations would do better on a foam mattress.” Needham, who’s only experimented on traditional mattresses, added that mites prefer the polyester layer just below the mattress ticking. (Note to those with pillow-top mattresses: The more pillow-y your mattress the more polyester it contains, therefore the higher your mite population.)

The good news is that, unless you’re allergic to them, dust mites cause relatively little harm. They don’t bite and they’re not parasitic—the worst thing that can come from a dust mite infestation, comforted Needham, is an unpleasant odor. Those who are allergic (about one-third of individuals tested) don’t always have symptoms. However, the proteins in dust mite feces can cause allergic reactions like watery eyes, a runny nose, and, in severe cases, asthma attacks.

Mattress companies like to use dust mites as scapegoats to peddle their products: A common statistic cited by people like Larry over at Sit ’n Sleep is that your mattress doubles in weight every eight years thanks to a combination of human debris and dust mites. Although dust mites do shed their skin, defecate, and reproduce within your mattress, Needham reckoned a significant increase in weight due to mites is unlikely. “The mattress industry has used that statistic to creep people out,” he said. “I don’t think anyone has ever done a real calculation. It’s an eye-catcher, and they’ve probably made estimates based on how many skin scales a person discards and how that debris is converted.”

But if you are totally creeped out by the idea of hundreds of invisible arachnids living in your mattress, you can take steps to keep them out. Special allergen-proof mattress covers seem to help reduce symptoms for those with allergies. Needham said vacuuming your mattress with the same vacuum you use on your carpet has been shown to decrease dust mite populations. Dust mites don’t like heat, so spreading an electric blanket over your bed and turning it on high might also eliminate mites, as would a steam iron (something his daughter once tested at the science fair). If you have an old-fashioned two-sided mattress, flipping it every few months will also keep the mites at bay—“flipping the mattress removes the humidity zone, so most of the mites probably die when it’s flipped,” Needham said.

So next time you’re feeling lonely at night, cuddle a little closer to the tiny, eight-legged bugs waiting just centimeters away from you. “You don’t think of a mattress as having an ecosystem,” marveled Needham, “but it really does.”

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

5 Common Types Of Sleep Disorders

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

Minor and major sleep disorders are becoming an increasingly common occurrence in modern times, especially prevalent in individuals who have for whatever reason failed to embrace healthy and stress-free lifestyles. It’s important to note that the most common sleep disorders doesn’t necessarily mean lack of sleep, it can also mean too much of it, or alternatively could be neither, but instead something that occurs during slumber that isn’t classed as a normal sleeping habit such as excessive snoring. Broadly speaking, these types of disorders occur in the form of compromised rejuvenation, and will eventually compromise the overall well-being and health

The post 5 Common Types Of Sleep Disorders appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Buying Guide: Size Matters

by The Daily Dozers @ The Daily Doze

Finding the right size mattress is a crucial component of creating your perfect bedroom. Whether you want a king mattress that you and your partner can stretch out on or a twin mattress for the littlest sleeper in your family, we can help you stretch your budget further so that you can get the bed […]

The post Buying Guide: Size Matters appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Mattress Firm’s Big Game Bargains

by The Savvy Savers @ The Daily Doze

With the Big Game happening this weekend, there is no time like today to stock up on game day savings. In honor of the face-off between New England and Philadelphia, several businesses are offering discounts to give football fans across the country another reason to celebrate. See below for a full list of the best football weekend […]

The post Mattress Firm’s Big Game Bargains appeared first on The Daily Doze.

Sofas & Futons

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

Call A Mattress has a large selection of high quality brand name sofas and chairs available in our showroom and catalogs.

The post Sofas & Futons appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Mattress recycling: Industry finding useful ways to dispose of used beds

Mattress recycling: Industry finding useful ways to dispose of used beds


BedTimes

Mattress recycling is gaining supporters both inside and outside the bedding industry. The sight of a filthy, old mattress lying on the side of the road is an ugly reminder of a problem. What happens to mattresses at the end of their useful life? Where do they go and who is responsible for disposing of them?

New & Improved Recycling Locator

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

Before California, Connecticut and Rhode Island passed their recycling laws, The Mattress Recycling Council developed a list of recyclers across the country known as the recycling locator. Now that these states have implemented their Bye Bye Mattress program, the locator has grown to accommodate collection sites and collection events, as well as a growing audience […]

The post New & Improved Recycling Locator appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

Press Conference Held Today to Launch Bye Bye Mattress

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

Sacramento, CA – Today, government officials, municipal and solid waste representatives and the mattress industry gathered at the state Capitol building to commemorate the launch of the state’s new mattress recycling program. “For too long, abandoned mattresses have blighted our communities,” said Sen. Loni Hancock, D-Oakland, author of the measure that created California’s mattress-recycling program. […]

The post Press Conference Held Today to Launch Bye Bye Mattress appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

Platform Beds

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

From traditional to modern, Call A Mattress carries a large variety of platform beds for your new discount mattress.

The post Platform Beds appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Best 12 Inch Memory Foam Mattress

by Taylor Jones @ The Drömma Bed

One of the best investments you can make for your health and mental wellbeing is a quality mattress. A comfortable, supportive bed will let you fall asleep quickly and rest deeply. If you’ve suffered for years under old-fashioned box-spring mattresses, it’s time to make the upgrade to memory foam. Memory foam is structured to conform to your body’s natural contours, supporting your spine in neutral alignment. This lets you rest securely, with nothing poking at you or shifting your body into a strange position. You’ll wake up refreshed and comfortable. However, to take full advantage of this material, you’ll first […]

The post Best 12 Inch Memory Foam Mattress appeared first on The Drömma Bed.

BugsInTO on "buying a used mattress"

by BugsInTO @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

Used mattresses. People will probably howl!!! The used mattress trade is very good for spreading bedbugs.

Our mattress is a used mattress, but it came from people we knew. Friends who were being married and in combining their households generously gave us their extra queen-sized mattress. But, this was 10 years ago....before the bedbug scourge had begun its double-digit rate of increase.

From what I have read, there doesn't seem to be any way to ensure a mattress does not have bedbugs, and there is no way to easily treat a mattress to ensure any bedbugs are killed.

There are fumigants like vikane, but this is more expensive. Research it, but you might find that the extra cost of vikane will be prohibitive.

Certainly encase. I would encase even a brand-new mattress.

Also, be careful of the method by which the mattress is transported. Mattresses get infested from trucks, elevators etc.

Good luck

The Creepiest Book of the Year Imagines a World Without Sleep

The Creepiest Book of the Year Imagines a World Without Sleep

by Dan Kois @ The Drift

Going to sleep has always seemed a little bit like magic. You can’t make yourself do it; the harder you try, the less likely you’ll be able to tumble into slumber. It just has to happen. The magic of that inexplicable moment is why Adrian Barnes’ Nod is the creepiest book I’ve read this year. Set in Vancouver, Canada, but chronicling a very frightening worldwide apocalypse, Nod takes advantage of a fear you maybe didn’t even know you had: the fear that one night, for no reason, your body might forget how to go to sleep.

In Nod, everyone forgets how to go to sleep. Well, nearly everyone: Perhaps 1 in 10,000 human beings manages to sleep at night, while the rest of humanity descends into chaos and madness with terrifying speed. I talked to Barnes about the medical understanding of chronic sleeplessness, the world inside dreams, and how his cancer taught him that insomnia’s actually not the end of the world.

So what happens to someone who gets no sleep at all? What’s the general timeline of degradation?

Well, my own experience indicates that humans get grumpy after two nights. Beyond that, my reading indicates that we become insane and have hallucinations after one week. Scientists are guessing when they suggest that we will die after 30 days. There are no volunteers to find out!

Did you speak with experts or do specific research on the effects of constant insomnia?

I read a little but found no proper answer. But it’s a massive metaphor—unsleeping is our lives! I felt it was a perfect way of examining the modern world.

What do you mean by that?

I feel like we think we see “reality,” but we mostly see a sort of madness. And so the “insomnia” is a neat little metaphor for that concept. Obviously, the modern world is just insanely overloaded and we can’t really process it all.

Even as our hero Paul manages to sleep—one of the few—the world of the book gets more and more dreamlike, with characters behaving in unexpected ways and surprising developments occurring out of the blue. What do you think dream logic has in common with the plot of a novel?

I am currently working on my new novel, Pod, which goes directly into that question. Overall, I have three novels planned to tell Paul’s whole story and to express all my thoughts on these questions. The third is called God. Nod, Pod, God.

I am fascinated by consciousness and dreams. No doubt dreams are massively more exciting and interesting than conscious life. When I’m awake, I think my dreams are more real and powerful than what I see around me. Well, in Pod, the dreams simply take over. Good dreams, of course, and evil ones.

When I wrote Nod I was consciously trying to create characters and events that exist beyond my own consciousness—I’d invent people and places that are bizarre and then try to force them into my novel. Oddly, I’ve been thinking like this since I was a teen, when I used to try to find poems beyond the real world. Then I’d try to write them back home to our world. Lord, that sounds weird!

A little! But there is a long tradition of artists discovering images, characters, and plots in “other worlds,” whether dreams or altered states. Are there other books or stories that feel particularly otherworldly to you?

Well, inevitably I go to four loves of mine: Lewis Carroll, Harlan Ellison, the Beatles, and Bob Dylan. A weird set of choices, I know. All four of those artists changed my view of the world. And there’s a pattern between them all: Dylan and Lennon both aspired to Alice in Wonderland in trying to write their own books (Tarantula by Dylan and In His Own Write by Lennon), and Harlan is a massive Alice man.

Children seem to have a different response to the crisis in Nod than adults do. How do you think children experience sleep, and how does it differ from adults’ experience?

I think children are more comfortable with dreams than realities. In fact, they often scowl at reality—things like school and parental rules. Good for them, I say. My favorite book is Alice in Wonderland, a story children have always loved—they feel like Alice themselves. I see children as more sane than adults. Adults are going insane by trying to insist on the limits of what we see around us.

Sleep deficits seem to be something of an invisible crisis for many people: teenagers who have to get up crazily early for school, new parents trying to return to work with a crying baby keeping them up at nights, people in jobs as blue-collar as trucking and as white-collar as medicine working long shifts and endangering others. Do you think we as a society undervalue sleep?

God, yes. There’s a kind of rest that comes from letting the brain go loose, freed from “reality.” We simply don’t value sleep any more. Or at least 99 percent of us don’t. Sleeping is how we survive, literally. The human survival list is “must drink water, must sleep at night, must eat food.” In that order! But we forget about the middle one. 

You’ve said you had the idea for Nod because you yourself are an insomniac. How does that affect your life?

Sleeplessness shows me more reality, odd though that sounds. I remember snow coming down late at night when I was 8 years old and couldn’t sleep. I’d be standing on my bed and watching flakes fall slowly late at night. Eventually, of course, my mom would check on me and say, “Go to sleep!” And other times, she’d say, “Wake up!” I began to wonder about the world my parents claimed to be real.

More recently, I was found to have a really deadly cancer. It grows and spreads in my skull—a real terror with a tumor the size of a plum. Attached to it are little “worms” growing from the main tumor and spreading across my skull. Over the last year my skull was chopped, my brain lumps were chopped out, and I was drugged and radiated month after month. So since I wrote Nod I have learned a lot more about the “real” universe and lack of sleep.

And the good news it is that it turns out insomnia is not bad at all. I now see the whole universe, having lost the old world. And it’s so beautiful. I now tend to say my cancer is a blessing. If nothing else, these experiences will help me from the lies around us. I’m very grateful for it.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

Multi Set Specials

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

Let Call A Mattress furnish all your bedrooms with mattress sets.  We are offering special pricing for multiple sets.  Below are our some of our specials. If you would like special pricing for more than one mattress set give us a call at 352-376-0953.  We will gladly make you a [...]

The post Multi Set Specials appeared first on Call A Mattress.

What’s Actually Happening When Part of Your Body Falls Asleep?

What’s Actually Happening When Part of Your Body Falls Asleep?

by Claire Landsbaum @ The Drift

You wake up from a hard sleep and think everything is excellent—until you try to move your arm. Instead of responding to the commands of your central nervous system, your forelimb, which has been trapped under a pillow or pinned between couch cushions, stays limp. With growing alarm, you realize your arm is devoid of sensation. Panicked, you remove it from beneath the cushion and shake. Nothing. “Thwack!” it goes into the mattress, or “thwack!” against the back of the couch. A stinging sensation begins from the point of contact and travels to your shoulder. You inhale with pain and exhale with relief. Your arm is finally “waking up.”

In colloquial terms, when we remain in one position too long and an arm or a leg goes numb, we say it has “fallen asleep.” But in the scientific world, this is called paresthesia. What, exactly, is happening during a bout of paresthesia—and can it ever be dangerous?

To understand paresthesia, it’s important first to understand how the nervous system works. “We think of nerve fibers that run through the body as pathways of communication,” said Lawrence Abraham, professor of kinesiology and health education at the University of Texas at Austin. “We gather information and bring it to our central nervous system from specialized sensory receptors all over the body. If there’s compression of the sensory nerves, we simply don’t get any information, so it feels numb. We might feel a thud—a mechanical transmission of force telling us we’ve run into something—but we don’t really know where we’re touching it.” A “sleeping” limb, then, is really one that’s just not in communication with the rest of the body.

Most people only experience temporary paresthesia, which happens when nerves are compressed during sleep or other long stretches of stillness. “It causes the nerves in your brain to process what’s happening at the periphery a little differently,” said Sarah Prinsloo of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. “It’s a signaling mechanism that allows your body to say you need to readjust.”

It’s equally possible for the central nervous system to make up sensations that aren’t happening at all, Abraham added. “Sometimes this is also related to constriction of blood flow—when blood flow stops to an area, the system shuts down. When it starts to come back, you get random signals coming from the recovering system, which is the pins-and-needles feeling.”

Like most automatic processes in the body, paresthesia is designed to keep us safe; in this case it prevents tissue death. The body constantly performs micromovements (think shifting your weight in a chair or wrinkling your nose) on an unconscious level to keep it in homeostasis—maintaining its internal environment in response to external circumstances—Prinsloo explained. But when something physically keeps us from moving, our brain becomes aware of the numbness and discomfort, thereby bringing the situation to our conscious attention. Then we can perform an action—like shaking or thumping or shifting our weight—to fix the situation and prevent long-term damage.

But don’t worry: A few hours of nerve compression and decreased blood flow won’t make your arm fall off. But if paresthesia continues over a period of days or weeks, it can lead to lasting damage. “For example, people who are paralyzed or who’ve lost sensory perception sometimes get bed sores,” Prinsloo said. “That’s because those signaling mechanisms can’t tell them to move.” Repetitive paresthesia over time can also indicate bigger problem such as permanent nerve damage, she added.

“When an unusual or unexpected or scary signal comes in, we have to learn to make sense of it,” Abraham said. “It’s interesting how, when we get signals we’ve never experienced, we make up meanings for them. When you were a little kid, you never thought your leg was falling asleep. But someone at some point said, ‘That’s what happens when your leg falls asleep,’ and you start to think, ‘This sensation means my leg is falling asleep.’ ” Folk explanations aside, your “sleeping” body part is hardly napping on the job—in fact, it’s trying to tell you something quite loudly.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

Learn How You Can Sell Your Used Mattress In 3 Easy Steps

Learn How You Can Sell Your Used Mattress In 3 Easy Steps


The Sleep Advisor

Tired of your old mattress? Learn how to sell it and get the most money out of it. But first, you have to check that it's ...

Down With Spooning!

Down With Spooning!

by J. Bryan Lowder @ The Drift

Why did Slate start a sleep blog? Find out here.

At the end of this past summer, I dropped my partner off for a year of dissertation work in Spain. On the flight back, I decided that if I was going to make it through this period of lame but ultimately necessary physical separation, I would need to get a handle on my emotions. (This became acutely apparent after an in-flight viewing of Pixar’s Inside/Out that left me sobbing over my complimentary plastic cup of vino rojo.) Because I am a Virgo or Type A or whatever, I tried to divide the unwieldy mass of sadness I was feeling into specific things I would miss, the goal being to then soberly evaluate whether each was really worth feeling sad about. Among the list—physical intimacy, cooking for two—one emerged that seemed fairly legitimate: sleeping together, and in particular all the pre-slumber snuggling and cuddling that’s supposed to entail.

However, a few months into the long-distance thing, I have a confession: I do not miss bedtime cuddling. Or rather, I do not miss that activity known, in a jarring conflation of bedroom and kitchen, as “spooning.”

For the uninitiated, spooning is meant to position you and your partner like two spoons stacked in a drawer (though on their sides), the contours of one body inclining organically into the other. It is the most basic way of doing that comforting mammalian thing where you hold another person—and most of us, at one point or another, want to be held. But just because spooning is the most basic cuddle method does not mean it’s the best. The more I reflect on spooning during my sojourn, the more I have come to see it as a terrible idea, one that’s fraught both physically and ideologically. My plea? Suspend spooning—indefinitely.

Let’s begin with a point that no spooner-in-recovery can hope to refute: After about 10 minutes, spooning becomes horribly uncomfortable. Sure, it’s nice to slide into bed with your special someone and snuggle up to their softness and warmth. But then, vexing questions emerge. Assuming you’re the big spoon (i.e. the person doing the holding), where to put your arms? Under and over the neck of your beloved? Around his waist? One under your pillow and the other draped over his side? (The last of these is the only way your arm won’t fall asleep and he won’t be forced to lie on a lump.) Then there are the legs to deal with. Do you stack them in twos? Does the big spoon drape one over the little spoon, thereby enhancing the envelopment? What if one person wants to stretch out while the other wants to scrunch up, fetus-style? It’s all very complicated.

And even if you do manage to sort out a configuration that works (for a time), the heat—the hateful, pajama-soaking heat—will soon build to intolerable levels. Sleeping bodies are basically furnaces; why in the name of Egyptian cotton did we ever think it was wise to smash two of them together, especially under blankets? Add to that the incessant breath of your lover on the back of your neck (for the little spoon) and the snores and jerky movements of either party, and you’ve almost guaranteed that you’ll wake up 20 minutes into dreamland just so you can separate to sleep in a reasonable fashion.

If the argument against spooning were only a physical one, I would not feel so strongly. After all, many people are gluttons for punishment—who am I to deny them their strange pleasure? But there’s a deeper issue here, a troubling aspect of spooning that emerges in the dimension of ideology, of what it all means.

Please recall the big spoon/little spoon roles I described earlier. A look at the gay adaptation of these terms is useful in exposing the power relationship they instantiate. Among gay men, big spoon and little spoon have become softer ways of signaling whether one is a top or a bottom during sex. But, as has been true of the top/bottom dynamic since the beginning, these also carry certain connotative weight: Big spoons are manly and will take care of you (provided you let them use you to take care of themselves); little spoons are fragile, passive creatures that need to be held and kept safe. This, of course, is fundamentally a sexist arrangement, one that casts the big spoon as “the man” and the little spoon as “the woman.” To say that this power imbalance is built into all acts of spooning—whichever the sexes engaged—is not, I think, an overstatement. Indeed, I would argue that spooning is always already a power play, a perverse strategy by which we nightly enact the unjust relations of “big” and “little” privilege that plague our society on every level. 

We can do better than this.

What we need is conscious cuddling, cuddling that takes into account the realities of our bodies, so easily taxed, and the pressures of a fallen social system that unnecessarily sorts us into limiting categories of big and little. Luckily, there’s a solution at the ready: Cuddle sitting up.

It’s bracingly simple, I know, but it is the balm we need. Vertical cuddling—whether with an arm loosely paced around the neck, or a head freely reclined on a shoulder, or just sitting cozily side-by-side—removes much of the risk of physical discomfort and all of the semiotic violence that spooning conveys. It also allows for intimacy we actually experience because we are, you know, awake.

When my partner finally returns, we will no doubt wish to be physically close (perhaps in yet unknown Spanish ways he is currently picking up). But mark my words, we will not absent-mindedly spoon. Instead, we will cuddle with our wits about us, comfy in the knowledge that we are making the world a better place, one squeeze at a time.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

We Buy Furniture *Click Here*

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

The post We Buy Furniture *Click Here* appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Top 5 Serta Adjustable Mattresses

by Star Newcomb @ The Sleep Judge

Contact 6: How old is your “new” mattress?

Contact 6: How old is your “new” mattress?


FOX6Now.com

MILWAUKEE -- When it's time to get a "new" mattress, do you really know how old a "new" one is? FOX6's Contact 6 went undercover to slice open a "bed of lies."Jennifer Rivera and Jackie Williams have questions about who else has been sleeping in their beds.Williams bought her bed from Best Quality Furniture near 12th and Vliet.Rivera got her bed from Shahd Linens on 16th and Lincoln Avenue.Two different stores, but these viewers got in touch with Contact 6 with the same story."He said it was new. He said everything in the store was new. Never mentioned refurbished, used, nothing," Rivera said."Told me they were new -- supposed to be brand new mattresses, and they weren't," Williams said.With a hidden camera, Contact 6's producer went into Shahd Linens, where the owner was up front and said the mattresses are "refurbished." The owner says he's never gotten any complaints, but then brings up Contact 6 and Rivera's complaint.Contact 6 sent another representative back to Shahd Linens with a hidden camera, and got a different story. The salesperson said nothing was "used."When Contact 6 brought the mattress back to FOX6, it was pretty easy for bedding expert Tom Cass to tell it was used. The tag stated "second-hand, used.""You can tell by the oxidation and the color on the foam that this is an aged foam, somewhat dry and cracked. There is very little doubt in my mind that this bed has been used for a significant period of time. It's probably 10 to 12 years old," Cass said."The average human expels about a pint of fluid an evening when they're laying in the bed, so over a period of 10 years, all of that moisture is going to be absorbed into that mattress," Cass said.It might be gross, but it's not illegal. The Department of Consumer Protection says selling refurbished beds is legal, but it's a violation to sell them as new -- like the Shahd Linen salesperson did in Contact 6's hidden camera investigation.At Best Quality Furniture, a salesperson told a Contact 6 representative the beds are refurbished."The insides are used, but they have been disinfected and everything. The outsides are brand new," the salesperson said.When Contact 6 ripped open the mattress, it didn't look clean."Certainly there's a potential of it being dust mites, their droppings, their remains, things of that nature," Cass said.Neither store wanted to look at the ripped apart mattresses. Both said the beds are manufactured in Chicago, and the supplier assures them the mattresses are sanitized, disinfected and safe for use. They also pointed out it's a great value for their customers.The queen size mattress from Best Quality was $133, while the mattress and box spring from Shahd was $169.Entry-level queen beds from Steinhafels go for $298 or at American for $255 -- beds you'll know are brand new, and not just new to you.

Brentwood Home Oceano Mattress Review

by Jessica Jones @ The Sleep Judge

Old mattress dumped for free under new state program

Old mattress dumped for free under new state program


SFGate

A statewide program that began this month allows anyone to drop off unwanted mattresses for free at participating recycling centers. Funded by an $11 fee that customers pay every time they buy a new mattress or box spring, the program — called Bye Bye Mattress — also mandates that retailers dispose of old mattresses when delivering a new one. The Used Mattress Recovery and Recycling Act facilitates the turning of old bed furnishings into a variety of consumer goods. The outer fabric and inner foam become carpet padding and building insulation. Public works employees in Berkeley cleared 1,100 mattresses off the sidewalk between June 2014 and June 2015. Because of their size and consistency — wood and metal encased in polyurethane foam — mattresses can sit moldering on the street for years. Yet getting rid of them was never easy, said Arthur Boone, a veteran of the recycling business who ran a mattress dismantling factory in East Oakland in the 1990s. “The garbage people hate mattresses because they tear up bulldozers,” Boone said. [...] that process can’t happen in a landfill, so mattresses have to be hauled to special plants like the one Boone ran, where workers strip apart their materials. When a mattress arrives at the DR3 warehouse, it gets stripped, skinned, eviscerated and fed through a shearing machine. Since the statewide recycling program began Jan. 1, DR3 Recycling has seen a huge spike in business, said General Manager Robert Jaco. Bay Area Mattress Recycling Centers where people can drop off unwanted mattresses for free:

Pure Grow Wool – Raising the Baaaa-r

by Mariah Bankemper @ SleepLily

Pure Grow wool is SleepLily’s favorite fiber. It is completely natural, non-toxic, and cruelty-free. What’s so great about Pure Grow Wool? Wool can do incredible things, which is why Pure Grow wool is featured in our non-toxic mattresses. Wool has been used all over the world for centuries because of it’s incredible properties. Here are 3 of the... Read more »

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Tempur-Pedic Alternatives In 2018

by Lindsay S @ Choose Mattress

While you may or may not love your bed, ask yourself – how comfortable are you while sleeping on it? Replacing your decade old mattress can help you sleep comfortably, but choosing the best mattress isn’t always as simple as one may think. For example, brands and types are abundant, and budgets range from cheap to very expensive, so scrimping could be detrimental to health, whilst overpaying could be pointless. If you’ve chosen the wrong mattress for yourself in terms of comfort, you’d most likely end up having a tough time sleeping and eventually suffer from sleep deprivation. Comfort aside,

The post Tempur-Pedic Alternatives In 2018 appeared first on Choose Mattress.

Choosing Between a King and a Queen

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

If you’re in the market for a new bed, you have several decisions to make. At 2 Brothers Mattress, we have numerous options in every area, including price, brand, style and many others. One of the most important considerations here? The size of your new...

The post Choosing Between a King and a Queen appeared first on 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork.

MRC Adds New Territory Representative to California Team

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

MRC would like to welcome Elizabeth Wagner to our California implementation team. She will be responsible for a variety of program tasks including working with municipalities, retailers, recyclers, and other mattress generators in Northern California. Wagner’s previous experience includes over two years working for CalRecycle to oversee product stewardship programs affecting other product categories in […]

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Does Your Mattress Really Gain Weight Over Time?

Does Your Mattress Really Gain Weight Over Time?


Live Science

Your mattress is full of dead skin, sweat and bugs. How much weight do they add?

The 6 Best Rated Hybrid Beds – 2018 Reviews & Comparisons

by Mark Reddick @ The Sleep Advisor

The post The 6 Best Rated Hybrid Beds – 2018 Reviews & Comparisons appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

The Health Effects of Old Mattresses

The Health Effects of Old Mattresses


Amerisleep Blog

A worn out mattress can do more than ruin your sleep. Here, the health effects of old mattresses.

Bargain Basement Deals

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

The post Bargain Basement Deals appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Our Leesa Bed Review For 2018 – Should You Buy It?

by Jill Thompson @ The Sleep Advisor

The post Our Leesa Bed Review For 2018 – Should You Buy It? appeared first on The Sleep Advisor.

Are These Toxic Materials In Your Mattress?

by exampleuser @ SleepLily

One of the most surprising things about toxic chemicals in mattresses is how incredibly common they are. In fact, mattresses that are off-gassing harmful VOCs, and emitting toxic chemicals seem to be the norm, and not the exception. Even worse, this is true even of many mattresses claiming to be “organic” or “all-natural.” How can this... Read more »

The post Are These Toxic Materials In Your Mattress? appeared first on SleepLily.

Our Lunch & Learn: Say Hello To Bye Bye Mattress at ISPA Expo 2016, Wednesday, March 9th 12-1PM

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

Bye Bye Mattress is the consumer-facing brand created by MRC.  MRC was created to run the newly-minted mattress recycling programs in California, Connecticut and Rhode Island.  Learn about mattress recycling from the viewpoints of regulators, operators, retailers, and PR experts.  Hear how the industry is responding to these programs and how MRC is using consumer […]

The post Our Lunch & Learn: Say Hello To Bye Bye Mattress at ISPA Expo 2016, Wednesday, March 9th 12-1PM appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

Don’t Sleep on “Don’t Sleep on.” The Phrase Is Evidence of the War on Sleep.

Don’t Sleep on “Don’t Sleep on.” The Phrase Is Evidence of the War on Sleep.

by Katy Waldman @ The Drift

I don’t mean to alarm you—your alarm clock will do that—but you have almost definitely slept on something in the past 24 hours. Maybe this revelation leaves you untroubled. Maybe you are pointing to your bed and agreeing: “Yes. Yes, I slept on that.”

Or maybe you take pride in your ability to “sleep on” things. Circumspect and willing to give a dilemma its due consideration, you refuse to rush important decisions. Your stately patience, you might point out, recalls Henry VIII. According to government papers from 1519, the king once told an adviser he wished to “slepe and drem apon the matter, and geff me an answer apon the morning.” So too the commanders of the ancient world: In Livy’s History of Rome, the consul Servilius postpones a military decision with, “I will sleepe upon it and bee well advised what to doe for the best.” Equally wise and prudent, young Meat Loaf urges his girlfriend to “let me sleep on it” before pledging to love her till the end of time in “Paradise by the Dashboard Light.”

But maybe you feel accused. An odd and masochistic strand in our culture characterizes sleep—which knits up the raveled sleeve of care, which irrigates the spirit—as wrong. She who refuses dreamland atop a satiny pile of mattresses, because of one pea, belongs on a throne. Janelle Monáe sleeps with one eye open; it is implied that the habit both enhances her badass status and makes her good at yoga.

Look no further for evidence of the continuing War on Sleep than the recent transformation of the idiom “to sleep on.” If the phrase once meant taking an issue seriously enough not to treat it hastily, now these words suggest the blinkered and irresponsible opposite: to underestimate or ignore a problem. “Don’t sleep on me hoe,” threatened the rapper Pouya in 2012. He meant: Be awake or alert to the power of my flow. A Key and Peele sketch from that same year featured Peele as a college-aged Barack Obama, talking about how to throw the most inspirational party in campus history. “Don’t sleep on Barry O,” the POTUS-to-be instructed the camera, intercepting a joint on its way around the table. The line combined the braggadocio of “Hide your kids, hide your wife” with the dignity of fulfilled prophecy.

The first widely meme’d instance of “don’t sleep on” in its “stay woke” sense may have come from How I Met Your Mother. In the 2009 episode “The Sexless Innkeeper,” a character solemnly advises his neighbor not to “sleep on the gouda” at a party. The humor here flows from the significance this guy is assigning gouda, obviously, but also from the latent threat in the imagery of repose and wakefulness. Not only does a Dutch yellow milk product merit appreciation and attention, but it calls for wariness—let no poor sluggard be surprised by gouda in the night! Tupac tugged the same ominous thread back in 1996, with his track “Don’t Sleep” (though he didn’t add the preposition on):  “We gon’ ride/ Keep my pistol on my side/ Always creep wit’ the nine …Don’t sleep.” Pac’s verse points at another layer, one echoed by the Juicy J song “Real Hustlers Don’t Sleep”: The reason you don’t shut your eyes on men like Pouya, Tupac, and Barry O is because none of them are sleeping. They won’t rest until they get what they want. (Compare the oft-quoted lyric-turned–gangster movie “I’ll sleep when I’m dead.”)

Of course, by now we’ve also managed to etiolate “don’t sleep on” into a snooze-a-roo piece of marketing cant. Nike Golf unveiled a “Don’t Sleep on Summer!” swag bag in 2014 to promote several new products, including Lunar Waverly shoes and a Flex-Fit Tour Cap. (I feel OK about sleeping on a Flex-Fit Tour Cap.) Nike’s version of “don’t sleep on summer” just means “don’t not do all the summer stuff you want to do” (and also, “buy some golf gear.”) Likewise, a graphic communications blog chirpily recommends that companies “don’t sleep on the fourth quarter.” A promotional video sure hopes we don’t sleep on the “alcoenergy drink” Rave Up. (We won’t! One bottle contains 1,080 mg of caffeine.)

The “be inert or inactive” sense of “sleep” has a long history. As early as 800, anything passive or dormant might be said to “sleep,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary. From 1817, businessmen spoke of “sleeping partners” in commercial ventures—people or institutions who did not share in the actual workings of the enterprise. During the Cold War, a “sleeper cell” came to denote a unit of spies or terrorists who lay quiescent in a host country.

Unsurprisingly, inertia and inactivity don’t always mesh well with the American ethos. We are doers! And we are also chronically zzz-deprived. On the Beyoncé track “Mine,” guest artist Drake raps his version of carpe diem: “Don’t sleep when you know you got it good, girl.” That entreaty—don’t miss out—seems a little softer, a little safer, than the warning not to let down your guard, because the gouda is coming. But to a sleep partisan, it still feels depressingly negative. I long for the days of Servilius and Henry VIII, when to “sleep on” a matter exposed one’s judgment, not one’s unpreparedness or sloth. Maybe mounting awareness of the virtues of shut-eye will swing the linguistic pendulum in a more forgiving direction. (Watch that linguistic pendulum. Are you getting drowsy?) Hey, if she can’t sleep, a girl can dream.

Read more from the Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

How to Clean A Mattress: The Ultimate Guide

How to Clean A Mattress: The Ultimate Guide


Insider Living

The most comprehensive mattress cleaning guide on the internet.

Connecticut Program’s Annual Report Released – 150,000 Mattresses Diverted From Landfill

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

Last week, the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) presented its inaugural Annual Report of the Connecticut Bye Bye Mattress Program to Connecticut municipal leaders and state regulators. The report summarized the Program’s performance from its inception in May 2015 through the end of the state’s 2016 fiscal year (June 30). The Program has already exceeded, met […]

The post Connecticut Program’s Annual Report Released – 150,000 Mattresses Diverted From Landfill appeared first on Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island.

Statewide Mattress Recycling Program Debuts In California December 31

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

Tomorrow, California becomes the second state in the nation with a statewide recycling program for used mattresses and box springs. The program, known as Bye Bye Mattress, allows California residents to drop-off used mattresses at participating collection sites and recycling facilities for free. California residents can find their nearest participating collection site or recycling facility […]

The post Statewide Mattress Recycling Program Debuts In California December 31 appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

Dream On Me Recalls Crib And Toddler Mattresses

by BedTimes @ BedTimes

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Piscataway, New Jersey-based Dream On Me voluntarily has recalled 23,400 crib and toddler mattresses that failed to meet the mandatory federal flammability standard for mattresses, posing a fire hazard. No injuries have been reported. The CSPC web page lists 10 recalled models. They include spring and foam […]

The post Dream On Me Recalls Crib And Toddler Mattresses appeared first on BedTimes.

Should You Pass Down A Used Mattress? | 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

Should You Pass Down A Used Mattress? | 2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork


2 Brothers Mattress - Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

In many families it is fairly common practice to pass down a used mattress to a child or other family member when somebody buys a new one. Many people also seek out purchasing used mattresses as an alternative to buying a new mattress. While you...

Sheet Care and Replacement Basics

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

2 Brothers Mattress is your first stop mattress store if you need a new mattress in Utah, but that’s not all we’re here for. We also provide numerous bed accessories, from bed frames and head boards to comfort items like pillows. One such comfort item...

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eatenalivenh on "buying a used mattress"

by eatenalivenh @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

I am in agreement with not bringing in a used mattress. Bed Bugs are very expensive to get rid of not to mention the emotional trauma that comes along with it. If you can at all avoid exposing yourself to bed bugs, by all means please do, I hate to see others going through this, it really is the worst thing I have ever had to go through

Bye Bye Mattress Is Springing Up In Your Area This Earth Day

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

We are springing into action with various appearances at Earth Day events in our operating states. Come say hello to Bye Bye Mattress in: CALIFORNIA In Northern California we’ll be participating in several family-friendly events aimed at educating these communities about recycling, sustainability and preserving the planet. Meet our team and learn how and where […]

The post Bye Bye Mattress Is Springing Up In Your Area This Earth Day appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

Mothers accuse day care of waxing their toddlers’ eyebrows

Mothers accuse day care of waxing their toddlers’ eyebrows

by Megan Pospychala @ FOX6Now.com

PASCO, Wash.  — Two mothers say someone at a Washington state day care center waxed their toddlers’ eyebrows without permission, according to KREM. Alyssa Salgado and Glenda Maria Cruz say they dropped their children off Thursday morning at the Pasco facility, and when they picked them up they noticed a red, splotchy patch between their eyebrows where hair used to be. “I think it’s a scratch but as soon as (I) get home I get a closer look these WOMEN […]

The Different Types of Mattresses: Shop Only the Best One that Suits You

by Douglas Belleville @ STLBeds

Mattresses come in all sizes, shapes, and styles, which can make shopping for one quite a task. It is easier to choose one when you learn the differences between each type. Guide to Better Understand the Different Types of Mattresses Firmness vs. Softness All of the extra layers that are sewn onto the top of…

Mattress Recycling | What Happens to Your Old Mattress?

Mattress Recycling | What Happens to Your Old Mattress?


The Sleep Sherpa

Mattress recycling programs are growing across the country. I take you inside a Minneapolis mattress recycling facility.

How to Sleep Better with a Cold

by Taylor Jones @ The Drömma Bed

Getting enough sleep is vital to preventing colds in the winter. In fact, according to the National Sleep Foundation, people who sleep fewer than 4 or 5 hours a night are four times as likely to catch a cold as those who sleep 7 hours or more. But if you find yourself with the sniffles despite your good sleeping habits, you may struggle with getting a good night’s sleep. Follow these tips for sleeping better with a cold. Keys to Sleeping Better with a Cold Learning how to sleep better with a cold helps you get the rest you need and may speed […]

The post How to Sleep Better with a Cold appeared first on The Drömma Bed.

Sonata-Allegro Snooze 

Sonata-Allegro Snooze 

by J. Bryan Lowder @ The Drift

Falling asleep at a concert—among the cultured classes, there are few faux pas ghastlier than this. And yet, even with the risk of devastating social opprobrium looming over the mezzanine, the symphony haunter sees it—or more often, hears it—as surely as the orchestra tunes to the oboe’s A. Somewhere in the hall, usually during a meditative largo passage or dreamy adagio movement, there erupts a series of sounds not called for in the score: a ragged snore, a rustle of fabric as an elbow meets a side, a startled intake of breath, and, finally, silence. Resisting the call of sleep in the concert hall is a rule of live performance one learns early, perhaps even before the prohibition on applause between movements. Close your eyes to better feel the music if you must—but don’t you dare fall asleep.

Here’s a confusing thing though: Swipe through the categories of your favorite curated music streaming service or browse the compilations section of your favorite album store, and you’re sure to find some variation on the category “music to help you fall asleep.” The music contained therein can be from many genres—my favorite service Songza has at least 12 stations explicitly promising rest, ranging from ethereal new age to dreamy indie to country. But when one searches for sleepy-time music, what one is most likely to encounter is a sampling of the classical repertoire, usually solo or chamber instrumental music (or low-key orchestral movements) and likely from the Romantic period. In other words, the same music that you’d be chastised for dozing off to during a concert is available for precisely that purpose when you get home.

Why does the taboo apply in one place and not the other? If it’s rude to sleep during a live piece of music—offensive to the composer and performers, unappreciative of the art itself—then why are we so comfortable with assigning a drowsing function to whole swaths of sound when we’re organizing it for everyday consumption? A lullaby by name is one thing; but if a composer has created a piece of music with the expectation that you will listen to all of it, can it be anything other than disrespectful to fall asleep—and intentionally at that—instead?

It would easy to just say no. Art is meant to be engaged with, a certain common sense goes, and you cannot properly engage if you are drooling on your pillow. Indeed, the preference in art music for wakeful listening is an old one. In the second, andante movement of his Symphony No. 94 in G Major, Joseph Haydn placed, after a quiet and stately presentation of the main theme, a sudden fortissimo chord complete with timpani. (The chord was so surprising, in fact, that it gave the piece its nickname, the “Surprise Symphony.”) Critics quickly spun a very popular anecdote out of the musical joke; namely, that Haydn intended the blast to be a rude awakening for audience members who had rudely drifted off. While Haydn later distanced himself from this explanation, sleeping patrons were indeed a nuisance in the composer’s late-18th-century milieu. As music historian Michael Steinberg writes of the “Surprise Symphony”’s 1792 premiere, “Londoners staggered from their heavy dinners—plenty of sherry before, hock and Burgundy during, and port afterward—into the cramped Hanover-Square Concert Rooms … ” That napping followed is, well, not surprising—even if it is objectionable.

But the Haydn example, however apocryphal, is still an issue of public performance, which depends on performers in front of whom it would clearly be insensitive to slumber. Does listening behind closed doors change the equation? Composer Jason Eckardt looks askance regardless of venue: “I don’t know of any composers, myself included, that wouldn’t want the full attention of the listener,” he wrote to me. “I suppose that one could be less than enthusiastic about their music making people drowsy, and perhaps the idea of streaming playlists that put listeners to sleep has more to say about the disengagement of the listeners rather than the content (or intent) of the music.”

But what about subgenres that seem designed to encourage sleep? Frédéric Chopin wrote all those lovely “nocturnes” for piano—can it really be a sin to close your eyes during a song meant to evoke the night? And then there are the so-called minimalists, folks like Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and John Luther Adams, whose expansive scores are definitely invitations to meditate. Why not dream as well?

For his part, Adams—whose 2014 Pulitzer Prize–winning “Become Ocean” recently reentered the news due to a generous nod from Taylor Swift—is open-minded. “From time to time my work has been called ‘soporific,’ ” he told me. “Although that’s probably not intended as a compliment, I’m not particularly offended by it.” Adams noted that for him music is fundamentally “a call to attention.” But he admitted that “there are many different modes of listening, and I’ve done some of my best work while sleeping.”

Allowing your resting mind to process and transform the sounds of nature—as Adams did with the Pacific while writing “Become Ocean”—is one thing. But no one composed the soundscape of the sea. Someone did, however, put a great deal of effort into those gorgeous nocturnes, minimalist unfurlings, and all the other music bedtime listeners gradually tune out as they go under. Whether you see this as a problem or not depends on your answer to a fundamental question—what, exactly, is music for? How are we meant to “use” it?

The model of use that says you should stay awake imagines music as an art object, a thing that someone has created to which we should extend the reverence of wakeful contemplation. And to be sure, Chopin meant for his nocturnes to, at the very least, function as entertainments (especially, in the 19th century, for the home musician); similarly, the minimalists mean for their drones and repetitions to stretch consciousness, not shut it down.

And yet, the notion of music as a serious art object is a relatively new phenomenon. The history of Western art music is one of the gradual progression of composition from tightly functional uses (folk dancing; the delivery of the Catholic mass) to increasingly abstract ones, like celebration atmosphere; theater, ballet, and film accompaniment; and, most strangely, a few hours of quiet listening in a special building staffed with highly trained professionals. In fact, it’s probably true that the respectful approach to music is something of an aberration in terms of use. Perhaps the rise of streaming services organized on activity and mood is really a return to the norm—a norm in which we use music to help us with something else, rather than submit ourselves to it entirely. I’m happily using a Cy Twombly piece as my iPhone background right now; should using a Beethoven sonata as nightcap really feel any different?

It’s worth being explicit here that without the advent of recording technology, this discussion wouldn’t be happening. Before the popular rise of listening devices and mass media, only the wealthiest could have afforded to have someone play them to sleep. (Or, as in the famous—though likely exaggerated—origin story of Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” at the request of the insomniac Count Keyserlingk, at least have your house musician Goldberg offer a little entertainment to pass the wee hours.) The ability to cheaply reproduce and distribute music has expanded not only how we may hear it but also how we might use it.

But choosing an album of Chopin or whatever art you wish to repurpose for your own twilight hour doesn’t have the same impact as determining, from some position of curatorial authority, that an artist’s work or whole genre of music is soporific. On the one hand, there’s a danger in repetition—stations or playlists that conscript legions of art music into the service of sleep necessarily look for similar musical characteristics, and so you end up hearing the same work over and over again. The risk here is of familiarity breeding not contempt exactly but more like habituation. When you’ve heard the “Moonlight Sonata” or other music of its sort a hundred times while brushing your teeth, it’s hard to appreciate it later as a singular work of art, should such an occasion come along.

Then again, at least you’re hearing it at all. Barret Anspach, a Julliard-trained composer who writes for both classical and pop ensembles, told me that he sees such playlist-making as “potentially harmful” because while it makes great classics into comfortingly invisible background music, the need for familiarity also excludes less common pieces that could both intrigue listeners and still be used for sleep. “Why not instead include Brian Eno’s ‘Music for Airports’ or Alvin Lucier’s ‘Music on a Long Thin Wire’?” he asked. “Sure, the tried and true is a sure bet for drowsiness, but the curation of so much tried and true leaves so much other great material off the bedside table, so to speak.”

The matter of whether any particular composer really wants their music on that bedside table—whether placed there by an independent listener or a professional curator—is definitely case by case. Eckardt would rather you didn’t, and Adams is relatively agnostic, but Suzanne Farrin doesn’t mind at all. She told me that to her “sleep is so precious that any music that can assist in that endeavor deserves the highest level of respect … I think composers who would be offended [by being placed in the sleep category] would probably not like their music in any category.”

Farrin’s view of sleep as a worthy subject for music is having something of a moment. At the 2014 Salisbury International Arts Festival, a trio of artists led by the violinist Pekka Kuusisto created an hour-long musical installation piece meant to put the audience to sleep; attendees were even invited to bring their own pillows and blankets. But the most ambitious intentional “sleep music” to date is composer Max Richter’s truly remarkable 8-hour composition “Sleep.” The piece, which comprises 31 individual tracks on the recently released iTunes recording, is a gorgeous, liquid journey through various minimalist motives and textures, mainly articulated by strings, piano, organ, and voice. Richter has explained his goal simply: “What I wanted to do is to sort of provide a landscape or a place—a musical place—where people could actually fall asleep,” he told NPR in September. As with the Salisbury piece, Richter’s live performances of “Sleep” will feature bedding; but you are encouraged to sample the album version wherever you prefer to curl up.

Of course, we shouldn’t take Kuusisto and Richter’s experiments as an invitation to pass out in every concert hall we enter. But their insistence that music can be both thoughtfully made and drowsily forgotten is an argument for relaxing, at least a little, our cultural anxiety around sleeping in the presence of art, especially at home. Determining whether such a response is disrespectful requires balancing the intentions of the artist, the aesthetic demands of the work, and the ultimate freedom of the listener to use art in a variety of ways. I’m listening to Richter’s “Sleep” as I write these final sentences, and I’m totally into it—for me, most music is just too engaging to be background noise at bedtime. But I’ve also come to think that, as long as we keep in mind that nodding off is one use for a given piece of music among many, sleep is a valid option. Let’s just try not to snore—that’s rude no matter where you are.

Read more from The Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

Down With Alarm Clocks! 

Down With Alarm Clocks! 

by L.V. Anderson @ The Drift

For most of history, people didn’t have to wake up at a particular time. They just had to wake up early enough to get their work done while the sun was up. If you were a farmer—and you probably were—you didn’t have a boss who would get mad at you if you weren’t at work by 9 a.m. In fact, you probably didn’t know when 9 a.m. was—you just knew when it was time to milk the cows.

That changed during the Industrial Revolution. As labor historian E.P. Thompson wrote in his groundbreaking 1967 paper “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism,” “The first generation of factory workers were taught by their masters the importance of time.” A factory is useless if all the laborers waltz in when they’re good and ready, so factory owners found ways to get everybody up for the morning shift. Factories blew loud whistles to wake up workers living nearby and to mark the beginnings and ends of shifts. In Industrial-era Britain, men known as “knocker-ups” were employed to rap on people’s windows to wake them up in time for work. By 1876, when the Seth Thomas Clock Company patented the mechanical, adjustable bedside alarm clock, the marketplace was ready for this invention. By now, waking up had nothing to do with the sun’s rise or the seasonal demands of agriculture and everything to do with an artificially imposed schedule of production whose rigidity never wavered.

Most of us no longer depend on other people to wake us up, but the way modern Americans wake up—to a loud, unpleasant noise—has more in common with the way 19th-century factory workers woke up than with the way our agrarian forebears woke up. It’s difficult to imagine modern capitalism without the alarm clock. Whether you’re taking over a shift, striding into a meeting, or just logging into Slack, you need to start work on time—which means you need to wake up on time.

You don’t need a sleep scientist to tell you that getting jerked out of deep sleep by artificial means is not ideal. As technology and our understanding of the sleep cycle have advanced, alarm clocks have taken new forms, each one promising to make awakening easy, or at least less terrible. Most fitness tracker wristbands come with built-in sleep trackers and vibrating alarms. You can subscribe to Sleeprate, a program that assesses your sleep habits, monitors your heart rate, and promises to clean up your sleep hygiene to make waking up easier. Sense, a system that tracks your sleep patterns via a detector attached to your pillow, in addition to monitoring bedroom “noise, light, temperature, humidity and particles in the air,” raised more than 24 times its $100,000 funding goal on Kickstarter in 2014. (Despite the flooded marketplace, most manufacturers still haven’t managed to perfectly duplicate the technology of sleep labs—there’s a great deal of variation in how well these apps and gadgets reflect your sleep patterns.) There are also a plethora of smartphone apps offering clever ways to shake off grogginess, like the Mathe Alarm Clock, which makes you solve random math problems to silence the alarm.

As someone who is terrible at rousing herself, I’ve tried many of these modern options, including one of the smartphone apps that allegedly monitors your sleep patterns and wakes you up when you’ve reached a phase of light sleep, a dawn simulator alarm lamp that slowly gets brighter and brighter as it approaches a preset wake-up time, and the SpinMe Alarm Clock, a smartphone app that requires you to stand up and spin around slowly for two full revolutions to turn off the sound, to discourage you from turning off the alarm and going back to sleep. Sadly, none of these have cured me of my habit of hitting the snooze button five or six times before miserably flumping out of bed. (I’m thinking of trying motorized window shades on a timer to flood my bedroom with sunlight next. Wish me luck!)

What most of the alarm clocks in this new generation have in common is that they promise to make waking up feel natural and easy, as though we were farmers being gently roused by the light of the rising sun. Perhaps then it’s no surprise that some biohackers have taken this notion further by training themselves to wake up at the right time without using alarm clocks at all and then bragging about it to the unenlightened masses who are still enslaved to our alarms. Maybe, as the dangers of inadequate sleep become wider known, more of us will throw out our alarm clocks and try to get back in touch with our circadian rhythms.

I doubt we will reject the utility of predetermining our wake-up time any time soon, though. More likely, alarm clock manufacturers will continue to pursue the holy grail of waking up: an alarm that effortlessly brings our bodies’ rhythms in line with the demands of the market, rather than the other way around.

Read more from The Drift, Slate's pop-up blog about sleep.

Can You Sell A Used Mattress? Yes You Can, Learn How

Can You Sell A Used Mattress? Yes You Can, Learn How


Choose Mattress

Planning on selling your mattress? Read this to learn the things you need to consider and for checklist of what to do before you sell your used mattress!

Pubescent Boys Hear a Lot About Wet Dreams. But They’re Not As Common As You Think.

Pubescent Boys Hear a Lot About Wet Dreams. But They’re Not As Common As You Think.

by Mark Joseph Stern @ The Drift

I remember the moment in vivid detail. Our middle school principal, a stoic woman with warm eyes and steely nerves, had called all seventh-graders to an assembly to discuss our impending school trip to Washington, D.C. As she broached the topic of sleeping arrangements—sex-segregated, of course, with four kids to each two-bed room—a nervous hush fell over the crowd.

“Ladies,” the principal said, “if you have your time of the month, just tell your chaperone and she’ll have the bedding changed.” A nervous titter rippled through the audience as students eager to demonstrate their worldliness made known their amused discomfort.

“And boys,” she continued, arching one eyebrow slightly, “if you have a certain dream that causes an accident in your sheets, just tell your chaperone and he’ll help you out.”

This was it—the moment we’d all been both dreading and eagerly anticipating. For two years, our burgeoning sexuality had been hushed up and hidden away, discouraged and dismissed. Now an adult—the principal!—had acknowledged something we all took to be a universal truth: Pubescent boys’ ingress into adulthood invariably involves spontaneous orgasms during slumber. Nighttime ejaculations. Nocturnal emissions. Wet dreams.

Like my classmates, I was impatient for wet dreams to begin. When I was 11, my mother had informed me of their impending arrival, then never spoke of them again. Our health instructor had mentioned them for about 40 seconds that same year, implying that virtually all boys got them. The message was clear: Wet dreams are normal, healthy, and ubiquitous. They might even be pleasurable—though you really had to read between the lines to get at that bit. I waited eagerly and enthusiastic to wake up to a wet, sticky spot in my sheets: proof, finally, that I had become a man.

I turned 13: No wet dreams. Fourteen, 15: No wet dreams. By the time I turned 16, I assumed I had a defective reproductive system. I despaired that the window of possibility had closed—wet dreams, after all, are said to be a young man’s game. By the time I turned 17, I had begun blaming myself, theorizing that my discovery of masturbation at age 12 had somehow forestalled this literally seminal moment of adolescence.

As it turns out, I wasn’t defective: I was simply receiving bad intel. We don’t know much about nocturnal emissions, but we do know that their prevalence is vastly overstated. (We know even less about female wet dreams, a distinct biological phenomenon that I must leave for another day.) Many men—perhaps a majority—never have a wet dream in their lives. Many others have only a handful. In fact, the few men who do experience frequent oneiric ejaculations appear to be the real outliers.

You should take my conclusions here with a grain of salt. Nocturnal emissions aren’t well-studied, largely because researchers are skittish about talking to young boys about sexual pleasure—and vice versa. Even if some phlegmatic scientist did undertake to measure the commonness of wet dreams, he’d probably fail: Researchers infamously struggle to extract honest information from adolescents about their sexuality.

So, in researching this post, I interviewed as many men as I could—friends, acquaintances, family members, colleagues—without violating norms of decency or HR policies. Of my 30 respondents, only one said he’d had wet dreams regularly as a teen. (He noted that virtually none of his friends ever got them.) Another said he’d had a few during young adulthood, calling them “all mess and no joy.” Several others speculated that they might have had one or two but weren’t sure. The great majority were certain they had never experienced the phenomenon. Yet almost every respondent was told in health class that most boys get wet dreams routinely, at least at the cusp of puberty.

What gives? Why are so many boys being told to expect wet dreams when so few will ever actually have one? I have two theories. The first is that health instructors use wet dreams as an analog to menarche, or first menstruation. Instructors have to talk about periods, since all girls get them, and they’re often pitched as girls’ entrance into adulthood. Wet dreams serve as a convenient (if false) equivalent for boys.

My second theory, and perhaps the likelier one, is that health instructors feel compelled to teach boys a little about their sex organs. Masturbation, however, remains a fraught topic, especially in schools. (In 1994, Republicans forced Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders to resign after she suggested that masturbation be taught to mature schoolchildren.) Informing kids about wet dreams allowed instructors to teach the basic mechanisms of ejaculation, without wading into the freighted subject of intentional pleasure.

I ran my theories by David Reitman, an adolescent medicine specialist at Georgetown University Hospital and the medical director for the American University Student Health Center. He found them both amusing and probably correct.

“What you’re looking at,” Reitman told me, “is sex being taught as a function of biology versus sex being taught as a normal human experience. These instructors aren’t teaching girls how to have an orgasm. They’re teaching them about menstruation. Similarly, they’re not teaching boys about masturbation. They’re teaching them about wet dreams, because wet dreams are something that the body just does on its own, whereas masturbation is a volitional act.”

Were my survey results accurate? “There is no data on this,” Reitman said. “There are no cold hard facts here.” But in his practice, he’s found that masturbation is much more common than wet dreams. “The questions I get from kids are always about masturbation, almost never about wet dreams. I’ve never had a kid say to me, ‘What’s normal in terms of wet dreams?’ Masturbation is the big release that these kids get. Most kids are doing it with enough frequency that they’re not having wet dreams.”

Does that mean that—as is often hypothesized—the more you masturbate, the lower your odds of getting a wet dream? Reitman laughed. “That connection has never been borne out scientifically,” he said. “Let’s get that straight right now.” But “anecdotally speaking,” that certainly is his suspicion.

I asked Reitman whether he thought the newer generation of doctors, parents, and instructors would be more candid in discussing the full range of sexual experiences with adolescents. Will they dare to move beyond wet dreams? “Nobody likes to think about 13-year-olds as sexual beings,” he told me. “But the younger generation of doctors that I’m working with and training are much more comfortable talking about this stuff. The culture has changed.”

My middle school still sends its seventh-graders on a yearly trip to Washington. I couldn’t quite bring myself to call the principal for this story and ask whether she still delivers the wet-dream spiel. But even if she does, I’m not too worried about the kids there now. When I was in seventh grade, my main source of sex education came from a CD-ROM of Encarta 95. Today, kids have a much savvier sex ed instructor, one more candid than the frankest middle school principal. It’s called Google.

Read more from The Drift, Slate’s pop-up blog about sleep.

History and Uses of Memory Foam

by seoteam @ 2 Brothers Mattress – Best Price Gurantee- Salt Lake, West Jordan, Orem, American Fork

When you hear the term “memory foam,” chances are you think of a mattress. This is one of the most common and well-known uses for this substance, but did you know that it also has numerous other essential benefits? Most people know very little about...

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Ocean State Waves Hello to Bye Bye Mattress

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

On Sunday, Rhode Island becomes the third state in the nation with a free recycling program for mattresses and box springs. The program, known as Bye Bye Mattress, has established free collection points in cities and towns across the state. Rhode Island residents can find their nearest participating collection site or recycling facility at www.byebyemattress.com […]

The post Ocean State Waves Hello to Bye Bye Mattress appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

nightmare on "buying a used mattress"

by nightmare @ Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums Topic: buying a used mattress

I think I got my bed bugs from a used mattress I bought. I inspected it very carefully when I purchased it, and everything seemed to be fine. Even when the PCO came to inspect, the mattress and boxspring showed no signs of bed bugs. It could have been only a single bug or nymph travelling on the mattress, that decided to settle somewhere on the baseboard when arriving at my house. I already spent a lot of money to get rid of bed bugs, way more than the price of purchasing a new mattress. I really wish I would never have bought this mattress to save some money. I consider it is not worth taking the chance. Now, if you still want to buy a new mattress, I would definitely put it in a very high quality encasement before taking it into the house. Good luck!

Bear Hybrid Mattress Review : Comfy Cozy with Celliant Benefits

Bear Hybrid Mattress Review : Comfy Cozy with Celliant Benefits

by Sleep Sherpa @ The Sleep Sherpa

The Bear HybridMattress is an innovative spring and foam mattress that has Celliant fibers woven into the cover. Celliant is an FDA determined medical devices that turns body heat into FAR Infrared energy and promotes recovery. Aside from the technology, what you get is a very substantial feeling mattresses with 5 layers of construction for […]

The post Bear Hybrid Mattress Review : Comfy Cozy with Celliant Benefits appeared first on The Sleep Sherpa.

Rhode Island Plan Approved

by Amanda Wall @ Mattress Recycling Council | Recycling Programs in California, Connecticut & Rhode Island

On January 13, 2016, the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation (RIRRC) approved the Rhode Island Mattress Recycling Plan proposed by the Mattress Recycling Council (MRC), a non-profit organization created by the mattress industry to develop and manage the statewide mattress recycling program established by General Law 23-90.  This makes Rhode Island the third state to […]

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We’ve Improved Our Recycling Locator – Check it Out!

by Admin @ Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council

We’ve said “Bye-Bye” to our old recycling locator technology. Getting rid of your mattress is hard enough, searching our site shouldn’t add to that frustration. We hope you’ll agree that these improvements have made a big difference. Personalized Map Display – No, we don’t know where you live, but you might think we do, because […]

The post We’ve Improved Our Recycling Locator – Check it Out! appeared first on Bye Bye Mattress | A Program of the Mattress Recycling Council.

Hilding Anders purchases Feather & Black

by BedTimes @ BedTimes

Mattress manufacturer and retailer Hilding Anders International, with world headquarters in Malmö, Sweden, has bought the business and certain assets of U.K. retailer Feather & Black. It will continue to operate as F&B, which specializes in bedroom furnishings, mattresses and sleep accessories. Retail veteran Paul Sweetenham was hired as F&B’s interim chief executive officer. He […]

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Mattress undercover: Do you really know what you're sleeping on?

Mattress undercover: Do you really know what you're sleeping on?


WJLA

Buying a mattress is one of the most personal and important purchases any of us can make. After all we spend nearly 230,000 hours of our lives in bed. But what if this most important purchase turned out to be like what 7 ON YOUR SIDE picked up at a Marylan

Why do Mattresses Have Toxic Chemicals in Them?

by exampleuser @ SleepLily

Why do mattresses have toxic chemicals in them? It’s a fair question. On a lot of levels it seems improbable – impossible even – that something as important as a mattress could be the source of toxic chemicals in our bedrooms. The mattress is, after all, the place we spend over a third of our... Read more »

The post Why do Mattresses Have Toxic Chemicals in Them? appeared first on SleepLily.

Pre-Owned Mattress Sets

by heathzee @ Call A Mattress

The post Pre-Owned Mattress Sets appeared first on Call A Mattress.

Earnhardt Manufacturing reorganizes top management

by BedTimes @ BedTimes

Earnhardt Manufacturing LLC, a supplier of knitted FR barrier fabrics and zippered mattress covers based in Roebuck, South Carolina, has named Frank Earnhardt chief executive officer and Jesse Beasley president. The company also has hired Michael Diemer for a newly created position of manufacturing general manager.  Earnhardt, previously president, started Earnhardt in 2006. Beasley, who has […]

The post Earnhardt Manufacturing reorganizes top management appeared first on BedTimes.

Used | Mattresses for Sale - Gumtree

Used | Mattresses for Sale - Gumtree


Gumtree.com

Find a used on Gumtree, the #1 site for Mattresses for Sale classifieds ads in the UK.

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